naltrexone alcohol

Naltrexone Alcohol Addiction Recovery Support

Alcoholism can steal everything good in a person’s life. It can also steal life itself. About 7% of the adult population, or approximately 15 million people struggle with alcohol addiction or dependency, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Those who are included in these statistics have likely suffered numerous negative consequences due to the alcohol problem. Although many may desire to stop drinking, their efforts may have been unsuccessful.

Naltrexone alcoholism treatment has been shown to offer hope to individuals committed to overcoming their alcohol dependence. Naltrexone is included in a collection of drugs referred to as medication-assisted treatment, which provides recovery support through the use of the drug along with adjunctive psychotherapy and medication management. For someone who is motivated to achieve a life of sustained sobriety, naltrexone may be an essential tool in obtaining this goal.

About Alcohol Use Disorder

Alcoholism starts off as alcohol abuse, excessive alcohol consumption that can precede the development of a chemical dependence on alcohol. If heeding the warning signs of a developing alcohol addiction, the individual can proactively take the steps necessary to change their drinking behaviors before addiction and dependence set in.

In fact, someone with an emerging or mild AUD may still have some control over the substance. These motivated individuals may be able to incrementally cut back on alcohol over a period of time until they are fully abstinent. To support this effort, attending 12-step meetings, embracing a sober lifestyle, and receiving outpatient therapy may result in a positive outcome.

When alcohol use becomes problematic, even in the early stages, it is called an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Depending on how many of the diagnostic symptoms are experienced in a one-year period, the AUD is assessed as mild, moderate, or severe. Generally, the longer the alcohol abuse has lasted the greater the chance that brain pathways have been altered and the more difficult the road to recovery.

The 11 criteria for identifying an AUD include the following questions:

  • Have you had occasions where you drank more or longer than intended?
  • Have you attempted to cut back or stop drinking, on more than one occasion, but couldn’t?
  • Do you spend a lot of time drinking or recovering from its aftereffects?
  • Do you experience alcohol cravings?
  • Has your alcohol use caused you to neglect family obligations, or caused problems at work or in school?
  • Have you continued to consume alcohol regardless of these problems?
  • Have you lost interest in, or discontinued, activities or hobbies you once enjoyed?
  • Have you engaged in high risk behaviors due to alcohol consumption?
  • Do you continue to drink even with it causing mental health or medical problems or a blackout?
  • Have you increased your alcohol consumption to achieve the initial effects once experienced?
  • Do you experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms when the effects of the alcohol are wearing off?

Answering yes to 2 or 3 questions indicates a mild AUD, 4 or 5 yes answers indicates a moderate AUD, and 6 or more indicates a severe AUD.

About Naltrexone

Naltrexone was FDA approved in 1994 to help treat alcohol dependency, and in 2010 it was approved for treating opioid dependency. Naltrexone is sold under the brand names Vivitrol and ReVia, and Depade, each with its own delivery method. As an opioid antagonist, naltrexone can block the pleasurable effects of alcohol in the reward center of the brain. As a result, the desire or temptation to use the substance is greatly diminished, reducing the risk of relapse. Naltrexone is available in a daily pill form, as a monthly time-release injection, and as a pellet implant that can last for months.

MAT is a short-term intervention, designed to help the individual during the early stages of recovery avoid relapse, with scheduled tapering off of the naltrexone about three to six months into recovery, although some may continue on naltrexone for longer periods. Over this period the MAT helps manage cravings until there is no real motivation for the individual to drink alcohol. Naltrexone is generally well tolerated with no potential for addiction, as it is not a narcotic.

Naltrexone Clinical Trials Demonstrate Efficacy

When the American Psychiatric Association developed clinical practice guidelines regarding the use of naltrexone for treating AUD their discernment was based on clinical trial data, as well as researching the balance of benefits versus harm. The APA concluded that the drug is a suitable intervention for treating moderate to severe AUD in patients who had been unable to avoid relapse following a period of abstinence.

Clinical evidence of efficacy is available through a large number of randomized controlled trials that studied the effects of naltrexone on study participants. A multisite study called COMBINE enrolled 1,383 participants with AUD and concluded that, when combined with ongoing counseling and good compliance that naltrexone reduced consumption and increased abstinence.

Naltrexone Side Effects

Over the years that naltrexone has been in use it has been studied carefully through clinical trials. In general, naltrexone is considered to be a safe treatment element for moderate to severe AUD with relatively minor side effects. Common side effects include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Chills
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Poor appetite
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Rash
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Anxiety

Medical Detox for Alcoholism

A medical detox is the first step in the recovery journey, and can be one of the biggest obstacles to initiating treatment for an alcohol use disorder. This is due to the harsh, sometimes dangerous withdrawal symptoms that can arise during alcohol detox. For this reason, individuals are cautioned never to approach detox without obtaining medical supervision. During detox the detox specialists will provide the necessary medications to minimize many of the withdrawal symptoms, and guide the individual safely through the process. In addition, the detox professionals offer important psychological support to encourage the individual to persevere.

Detox and withdrawal is usually completed within one week, although the severity of symptoms and length of detox duration depends on the length of history of chronic alcohol consumption, levels of consumption, age of the individual, general health status of the individual, and whether there are other substance use disorders present.

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms begin to emerge within 6-12 hours after the last drink:

 

  • Stage 1: The first stage of detox lasts about one day and includes such symptoms as shaking, headache, nausea and vomiting, irritability, sweating, and insomnia.

 

  • Stage 2: The second stage of detox lasts about 2 days and includes more acute symptoms, such as hand tremors, anxiety, high blood pressure, increased heart rate, seizures. There is a small risk of the individual developing the delirium tremens (the DTs) on days 3-4, which may necessitate emergency medical intervention.
  • Stage 3: The final stage of detox lasts several days and features subsiding withdrawal symptoms, lingering depression, and fatigue.

Alcoholism Treatment

Professional treatment for alcohol dependence should be a multi-disciplinary program that integrates therapy, 12-step participation, and naltrexone for qualified candidates.  This three-part approach to treating alcoholism, combined with a highly motivated individual, can be very effective in breaking free from the addiction. Here is how the treatment elements work together:

  • Psychotherapy. This mainstay component of alcoholism recovery helps the individual resolve underlying issues including life traumas, a co-occurring mental health condition, or unresolved emotional pain revolving around a failed relationship, death of a loved one, loss of a job, divorce, or any significant negative event. An evidence-based therapy that has been shown to be effective in addiction treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT addresses the kneejerk actions by the client after experiencing a stressful event or trigger, resulting in drinking. CBT helps them to adopt a more positive mindset and new healthy solutions and responses.
  • 12-step program (or similar non 12-step program). Peer recovery communities have been found to be an important resource for clients in recovery from alcoholism. The meetings provide a safe and supportive space for sharing and learning amongst the members. A sponsor can help the client by providing a backstop support resource during times of weakness. Both the sponsor and the peer group increase accountability, where the client feels beholden to work the steps and become stronger.
  • Naltrexone alcohol therapy. Naltrexone alcohol recovery support helps develop new brain pathways that no longer associate alcohol with pleasure. Cravings are reduced or eliminated through ongoing naltrexone therapy, and if the client slips up they will not experience the pleasurable high they had anticipated. Over time, the client will lose the desire to drink, which reduces the risk of relapse.
  • Aftercare. Recovery from alcoholism is an ongoing process therefore aftercare planning is an important aspect of the overall outcome. Aftercare measures can include sober housing for several months following treatment while the new sober lifestyle takes root. Other continuing care efforts should include continued participation in recovery meetings and attending weekly therapy sessions.

Naltrexone can improve the recovery success results for the individual seeking to live a life of sobriety and wellness.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers Naltrexone Alcoholism Recovery Support

Ken Seeley Communities provides a wide range of addiction treatment services, including intervention services, medical detox, outpatient programming, residential rehab, and sober living housing. Nestled in a beautiful and serene desert setting in Palm Springs, California, Ken Seeley Communities offers an effective blend of evidence-based psychotherapies, complementary holistic therapies, and a sense of community that helps foster a new healthy life in recovery. Ken Seeley has a long career in the field of addiction recovery, and is well known for his appearances on A&E’s Intervention series. For more information about our alcohol addiction treatment services, please reach out to us today at (877) 744-0502.

adderall overdose psychosis

Adderall Overdose Psychosis

Adderall is a prescription stimulant originally designed to treat ADHD and narcolepsy, but is also recreationally used as “the study drug.” Adderall is known to stave off sleep and increase energy levels and the ability to focus in healthy individuals, explaining why young people misuse the medication as a tool to keep up with their classwork.

A report published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry shed light on the misuse of Adderall among young adults, citing that 60% of all Adderall consumption was by 18-25 year olds. In fact, the article states that emergency room visits among young adults for Adderall-related visits had increased 156% from 2006-2011. Adderall overdose psychosis, seizures, and coma are included in those statistics.

Because of the highly addictive properties of Adderall, serious serious long-term health conditions, both psychological and physical pose a real threat to young adults in particular. The risk of Adderall overdose psychosis is one of the more serious adverse effects of this drug. Young people need to understand that a prescription stimulant can be just as dangerous as methamphetamine or cocaine and should not be misused.

About Adderall

Adderall is a stimulant composed of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, and available in doses ranging from 5-30mg. When someone of any age begins abusing Adderall in hopes of experiencing a boost in energy and mood, or desired weight loss, they are often unaware of the long-term effects that will occur with consistent abuse of this powerful stimulant.  After experiencing the initial euphoric effects, the brain’s reward system records it as pleasurable event and a pathway is mapped causing the individual to seek the high over and over again.

The stimulant works by increasing the levels of dopamine and norepinephrine in the central nervous system. Increased dopamine leads to the “feel good” effect, which is recorded in the brain’s reward system. Also, increased norepinephrine affects the speed that the brain responds to stimuli, resulting in the ability to manage large amounts of data or information. Over time the brain becomes dependent on the drug to re-experience these positive responses.

Adderall is a Schedule II controlled substance with highly addictive properties. The staggering increase in Adderall prescriptions is testament to its popularity among students in particular, who may obtain the drug by feigning ADHD symptoms. According to the New York Times article Generation Adderall, October 12, 2016, prescriptions for the drug have spiked since its introduction in 1996. In 2000 there were 5 million prescriptions written for Adderall. This increased to 9 million in 2005 and to 16 million by 2012. In fact, 42% of individuals aged 12 and older surveyed in the National Survey of Drug Use and Health in 2015 admitted using prescription stimulants without a prescription.

How Long Does it Take to Become Addicted to Adderall?

Because Adderall is a prescription medication many young people mistakenly consider it to be safe. In reality, Adderall has the same DEA drug classification as cocaine, morphine and methamphetamine, all substances with a high potential for abuse. Tolerance to Adderall ramps up quickly, and within a short time an addiction can develop. In a similar manner as cocaine or methamphetamine, it can take as little as two weeks to become addicted to Adderall. The addiction will quickly sneak up on the recreational user as the brain develops tolerance, and the negative effects will soon follow.

During this early phase, the drug continuously increases dopamine production levels in the brain, triggering the “feel good” sensation, or rewarding effect, and causing the individual to desire repeating the sensation again and again. As tolerance increases, more of the drug is required to continue to achieve the desired effects, quickly leading to Adderall dependence.

Symptoms of Adderall Addiction

Adderall causes both psychological and physiological dependence over time. Individuals may come to believe they cannot function without the drug, which is a sign of psychological dependence, or addiction. When someone is abusing Adderall there are clear signs and symptoms that begin to emerge. These might include:

  • Trouble sleeping
  • Severe mood swings
  • Loss of appetite resulting in weight loss or malnutrition
  • Irritability
  • Hoarse voice
  • Agitation
  • Upper abdominal pain
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headache
  • Restlessness
  • Erratic behavior
  • Tremors
  • Confusion
  • Anxiety
  • Dry mouth
  • Sexual problems
  • Rapid heart rate

Adderall-induced psychosis can occur as a result of long-term abuse of the drug, or as one of the more serious symptoms in the event of an overdose.

Adderall Overdose

As Adderall abuse increases, including snorting high doses of the drug, the risk of overdose is possible. Adderall overdose psychosis and other dangerous symptoms can occur, which constitutes a medical emergency. Signs of Adderall overdose may include:

  • Psychosis (hallucinations and delusions)
  • Panic attacks
  • Paranoia
  • High fever
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • High blood pressure
  • Break down of muscles
  • Tremors
  • Vertigo
  • Cardiac arrhythmia
  • Delirium
  • Hyperventilation
  • Severe tremors
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

Adderall overdose is treated by attempts to eliminate as much of the drug from the system as possible. Activated charcoal can help absorb excess Adderall in the gut, and sometimes the emergency measures will include stomach pumping or gastric lavage. Intravenous fluids may be administered to replenish nutrients and prevent dehydration.

Adderall Addiction Withdrawal Symptoms

When someone attempts to stop using the Adderall they may experience highly unpleasant withdrawal symptoms, which is a symptom of physiological dependence. The longer the history of Adderall abuse, the more difficult the withdrawal process will be. When someone who has become addicted to Adderall attempts to stop using the drug they will experience severe rebound effects and highly unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.  The common withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Foggy thinking
  • Irritability
  • Excessive sleeping
  • Agitation
  • Stomach cramps
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Trembling or shaking
  • Symptoms of depression
  • Concentration problems
  • Anxiety
  • Vivid or disturbing dreams
  • Increased appetite
  • Suicidal thoughts

Because of the intensity of Adderall withdrawal symptoms, attempts to stop the drug should be carried out in a medically monitored detox environment, followed by an inpatient treatment program.

Treatment for Adderall Addiction

Treatment for Adderall addiction will likely involve a residential rehab for a minimum of one month. The first important step is the medically supervised detox and withdrawal phase of treatment. With Adderall it is recommended that the individual be placed on a tapering schedule to gradually ease the withdrawal symptoms. The medical detox professionals can help manage the symptoms of depression and fatigue that began when the drug is discontinued, as well as other withdrawal symptoms that emerge.

Once the detox process has been completed the individual will begin an intensive addiction treatment program to help break the addiction cycle. This is accomplished through various evidence-based therapies and complementary activities, under the supervision of a clinical staff. These treatments include:

  • Psychotherapy. Integral to Adderall addiction treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT. CBT helps guide the individual toward adopting more positive responses to triggers, and to be able to recognize dysfunctional thought patterns that had led to Adderall abuse.
  • Group therapy. Groups participate in conversations about struggling with Adderall addiction and providing encouragement and support to each other.
  • Dual diagnosis treatment. If there is a co-occurring mental health condition, such as an anxiety disorder or depression, psychiatric support is provided alongside the addiction treatment.
  • Psychoeducation. Classes teach coping skills, emotion regulation, stress reduction, and organization skills.
  • Recovery meetings. Many rehabs integrate a 12-step or similar programming into the rehabilitation plan, which involves attending recovery meetings.
  • Aftercare. After rehab is completed, the individual engages in aftercare strategies, including outpatient therapy, life skills classes, and ongoing recovery meetings.

Healthy Ways to Manage Academic or Work Stress Without Adderall

Learning healthy stress management skills is essential to remaining Adderall-free. There are some helpful lifestyle changes that will help students better cope with their academic coursework or executives better managing their workload—all while keeping stress under control. These include:

  • Regular exercise. Adding a regular fitness routine into your week, even if it is simply a daily run or bike rid, can help keep stress under control in addition to improving sleep quality and mental alertness.
  • Healthy diet. Nutrition plays a part in brain health and the ability to focus and concentrate. A diet that limits junk food and caffeine and focuses on healthy foods will help increase energy, helping you get through the days without stimulants.
  • Organizational skills. Learning how to manage work or school demands is key to avoiding stress overload. Use a daily to-do list to stay organized, which will reduce stress and improve time management. Use organizational phone apps to help keep track of projects, assignments and due dates.
  • Practice mindfulness. Focusing on the present moment, while paying attention to the breathing process, can help diffuse stress and anxiety. Using the simple practice of mindfulness helps keep your focus on the here and now instead of stressing out about all the work that lies ahead.

Recognizing the dangers of Adderall abuse and overdose is an important lesson for people of any age. Avoid the use of stimulants and instead rely on healthy methods of managing workloads and stress.

Ken Seeley Communities Treats Adderall Addiction in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities is a full service addiction recovery program in Palm Springs, California. Covering all aspects of treatment for Adderall addiction or dependence, Ken Seeley offers a medically supervised detox program that will help manage the various stages of withdrawal prior to initiating treatment. We offer various options for treatment, including intensive outpatient programs, partial hospitalization programming, and residential rehab. For individuals selecting an outpatient option or transitioning out of residential rehab, sober living housing is also provided at Ken Seeley Communities. For answers about Adderall overdose psychosis or details about our program, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

Barbituate Overdose Treatment

Barbiturate Overdose Treatment and Recovery

Barbiturates are prescription sedatives that have taken a back seat to benzodiazepines for treating anxiety and insomnia. Even though these drugs are not prescribed frequently, they are still available and therefore represent a potential drug of abuse. When someone either accidentally or intentionally overdoses on barbiturates, it constitutes a medical emergency that requires immediate intervention.

Barbiturate overdose treatment involves multiple actions to attempt to minimize the drug’s effect on body systems. Medical personnel will administer various emergency measures to prevent potentially deadly barbiturate poisoning. Once barbiturate overdose treatment is successfully completed, the individual will transition to an addiction recovery program.

Someone who has developed a chemical dependency on barbiturates will need to undergo a supervised medical detox and withdrawal program prior to beginning addiction treatment. It is never advisable to attempt to stop taking the drug suddenly, as serious withdrawal symptoms can suddenly emerge. A medical detox team will gradually reduce the dosing of the drug until the individual has safely completed detoxification.

Treatment for the barbiturate addiction or dependency will involve multiple therapeutic interventions that are designed to help the individual establish new healthy thought patterns and lifestyle habits, resulting in a sustained recovery.

What Are Barbiturates?

Barbiturates, including phenobarbital, Seconal, Amytal, and butalbital, are a class of sedative-hypnotic drugs intended for the treatment of seizure disorder, preoperative anxiety, and insomnia. Because of the mild euphoric effects, as well as the relaxation properties of these drugs, barbiturates are illicitly abused recreationally. In fact, the 2018 SAMSHA survey reported that more than 32,000 Americans over the age of 12 had admitted misusing barbiturates.

Barbiturates, a chemical derivative of barbituric acid, work by acting on the central nervous system as a depressant, causing a sedated effect. Because of the drugs addictive properties and toxicity in the event of an overdose, most physicians now prescribe benzodiazepines for treating individuals struggling with anxiety or insomnia. However, barbiturates are still commonly prescribed for epilepsy, general anesthesia, acute migraines, and other purposes. These drugs are not recommended for use by a pregnant woman or in individuals over the age of 65. In addition, individuals with severe respiratory disease or kidney disease should avoid barbiturates.

How Are Barbiturates Misused?

As with any drug that is capable of altering brain chemistry through the central nervous system, barbiturates are highly addictive. When used on a regular basis, the body will become more tolerant to its effects, leading the individual to need higher or more frequent dosing to achieve the desired effect.

The short-acting barbiturates are the most recreationally abused form of the drug, as these provide the desired sense of euphoria and relaxation. These drugs include Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, and Tuinal. Barbiturates are often consumed with alcohol, which only amplifies the dangerous sedative effects that can result in toxic poisoning. Barbiturates may also be combines with the use of heroin and prescription opioids.

What Are the Signs of a Barbiturate Overdose?

Even someone who was prescribed a barbiturate for a legitimate medical condition is vulnerable to toxicity building up in the system. When someone has ingested more of the drug than the body can safely metabolize, it results in overdose. Initially, the individual may appear to be intoxicated due to alcohol, as those are the initial symptoms of a barbiturate overdose. Signs and symptoms of a barbiturate overdose include:

  • Shallow breathing, or even breathing that has stopped
  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Altered level of consciousness
  • Cognitive disruption
  • Appearing uncoordinated
  • Staggering
  • Low blood pressure
  • Slurred speech
  • Agitation
  • Irritability
  • Skin rash
  • Blisters
  • Faint pulse
  • Possible kidney failure
  • Heart failure
  • Coma

If an overdose is suspected it is imperative that 911 be called immediately.

Emergency Barbiturate Overdose Treatment

Obtaining timely emergency medical interventions for barbiturate overdose treatment is paramount, as one in ten individuals will die from the overdose. The medical personnel will conduct the following actions:

  • Determine that the individual’s airway is not blocked
  • Order blood and urine tests
  • Conduct a chest x-ray
  • Conduct an electrocardiogram (ECG)
  • Introduce respiratory support, such as intubation or oxygen treatment
  • Begin intravenous fluids
  • Provide activated charcoal through the mouth or nose to the stomach
  • Stomach washing

A dose of 1gram of barbiturates can cause toxic poisoning, and dosage of 2-10 grams can cause death.

When the Overdose is a Suicide Attempt

Barbiturates are powerful sedatives, making them desirable for individuals seeking to end their life. In fact, barbiturates are used for euthanasia and death penalty convictions to induce death. If a loved one has developed the symptoms of depression and has barbiturates in their possession it is essential that the drugs be taken from them. Be aware of the symptoms of depression and the red flags that can indicate suicide risk.

Warning signs of suicide might include:

  • Seeming despondent, hopeless, despairing
  • Change in eating habits
  • Losing interest in activities usually enjoyed
  • Appearing anxious or agitated
  • Withdrawing from friends and family
  • Increased substance abuse
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Expressing feelings of being overwhelmed
  • Expressing guilt or shame, feeling humiliated
  • Seeking information or items for suicide plan
  • Increased risk-taking behavior
  • Excessive fatigue
  • Says he or she is a burden to others
  • Makes a will, puts affairs in order
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Saying goodbye to loved ones
  • Talk of death or suicide

Someone who has attempted suicide will benefit from psychiatric intervention after the barbiturate overdose treatment has been completed.

Comprehensive Addiction Treatment for Barbiturate Use Disorder

Treatment for the barbiturate addiction or dependence will involve a full spectrum of therapeutic interventions that work together as an integrated approach to recovery. Treatment can be obtained at either an outpatient or inpatient program, with pros and cons for each.

  • Outpatient rehab allows the individual to remain at home while undergoing treatment. There are different levels of outpatient intensity, with the intensive outpatient program being the most often requested. An IOP involves 9 hours a week of recovery programming and lasts for an average of three months. Outpatient rehab offers more flexibility and is available at a lower cost when compared to residential treatment. However, outpatient treatment is best reserved for those individuals with a mild to moderate substance use disorder.
  • Residential rehab is the higher standard of care for addiction treatment. The programs involve the client residing at the treatment center for an extended stay of 1-6 months where they will receive intensive treatment and 24-hour support. Inpatient programs provide treatment for individuals with moderate to severe barbiturate addiction or dependence, as well as dual diagnosis treatment.

Treatment elements for barbiturate recovery include:

Medically supervised detox and withdrawal: Barbiturate detox and withdrawal is potentially dangerous, with risks surpassing those involved with alcohol or benzodiazepine detox. Therefore, a barbiturate detox effort should always be medically supervised, as potentially serious withdrawal symptoms can suddenly emerge. Detoxification is conducted under the supervision of a doctor who will prepare a detox plan for the individual. The first phase is to switch the individual to a benzodiazepine, and then followed by a scheduled tapering process to wean the individual off of the benzo. Withdrawal symptoms are carefully monitored, and medical interventions are provided to help minimize discomfort.

Individual psychotherapy: Therapy is an essential core element for treating the barbiturate addiction and any co-occurring mental health conditions, such as depression. The therapist will guide the individual to examine any potential underlying psychological issues and then help them resolve them. Some of the evidence-based psychotherapies used in addiction treatment include:

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Dialectical behavior therapy
  • Contingency management
  • Motivational enhancement therapy

All of these psychotherapies target behavioral changes, as well as shifting thought patterns away from negative, irrational thoughts to more affirming, productive thoughts.

Group counseling. Group therapy supports peer interaction through opportunities to share personal trials and experiences. Meeting with others who can relate to addiction or chemical dependence can provide a source for sharing and mutual accountability.

Medication management. To date there is no medication available that targets barbiturate addiction. However, if the individual is struggling with a co-occurring mental health disorder, the doctor can prescribe medications for help manage the symptoms.

Relapse Prevention: Individuals create a detailed relapse prevention strategy by identifying specific triggers or situations that could lead to barbiturate relapse, and then create an actionable response plan for when cravings or other triggers threaten sobriety.

Complementary activities: Addiction treatment now includes such adjunctive measures as recreational therapy, nutritional counseling, and holistic methods for promoting relaxations, such as yoga class, art therapy, massage, and meditation.

Continuing care services: Following completion of the treatment program, continuing care activities that help reinforce recovery are strongly advised. These might include staying for a few months in sober living housing, joining a 12-step community, and continuing outpatient therapy.

Individuals who have experienced a barbiturate overdose can reform their lives through comprehensive addiction treatment interventions.

Ken Seeley Communities Provides Barbiturate Addiction Treatment

Ken Seeley Communities is a comprehensive addiction and dual diagnosis treatment center in Palm Springs, California. Ken Seeley was an intervention specialist who was featured on the hit A&E series, Intervention, as well as an invited guest on several networks to talk about his effective intervention techniques. Ken Seeley founded Ken Seeley Communities with the intention of serving individuals seeking effective treatment for addiction recovery.

Ken Seeley Communities provides all aspects of barbiturate addiction treatment, including interventions, outpatient rehab, residential rehab, dual diagnosis treatment, sober living housing, and continuing care services. Our focus is on early intervention and comprehensive treatment, all within the context of a compassionate and respectful treatment environment. For more details about our intervention services and barbiturate recovery programs, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

soma addiction withdrawal symptoms

Soma Addiction Withdrawal Symptoms

It’s the same old story. Soma is yet another prescription medication that was said to be safe and non-habit forming…until it was discovered that it is indeed prone to abuse and addiction. Soma is a popular muscle relaxant that is prescribed for relieving pain associated with muscle injuries, such as sprains or strains, and is, unfortunately, often misused.

The problem with Soma is, as with other pharmaceuticals, that tolerance to its effects increases with time and more of the drug is needed to produce the positive effects. As dosage escalates the individual can become addicted. Soma abuse has similar effects to benzodiazepine abuse, including the very unpleasant soma addiction withdrawal symptoms. As with detoxing from benzos, Soma detox must be done according to a tapering plan to ease the individual through the detox process, and to avoid any serious withdrawal effects.

A medical detox program is the best setting for detoxing from Soma. Soma addiction withdrawal symptoms can include psychosis and other worrisome effects, which can be best monitored in a supervised setting.

About Soma 

Soma, the brand name for carisoprodol, is a popular muscle relaxant often prescribed in tandem with Xanax (to reduce anxiety) and Vicodin (to reduce pain). This trio of prescription drugs produces just the right effect that the patient may be resistant to giving them up, even after their skeletal muscle injury has healed. These three drugs together are commonly abused recreationally, as each drug enhances the effects of the others.

The normal daily dosage of Soma is 750-1050 milligrams, and the drug is available in tablet form. Because of its high propensity for misuse, Soma is typically prescribed for a short term, such as 2-3 weeks.

Soma acts on the central nervous system, acting as a muscle relaxant and sedative. Because of its effects alongside other prescription drugs, those who use Soma recreationally may develop an addiction.

Soma Short Term and Long Term Effects

In addition to the pain relief that Soma can provide, there are other effects of this drug that should be noted. Common side effects include:

  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Drowsiness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Changes in vision
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Lightheadedness, fainting
  • Extreme weakness
  • Giddiness, euphoria
  • Numbness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Irritability
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Depression

Long-term Soma abuse can lead to health risks as well. These include damage to the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, and brain. One very serious condition is called transient quadriplegia, which involves a temporary weakness of arms and legs.

An unintentional overdose of Soma can result in permanent brain damage or death. A Soma overdose is a medical emergency requiring immediate intervention. The signs of Soma overdose include:

  • Vomiting
  • Heart palpitations
  • Respiratory distress
  • Stupor
  • Extreme sedation
  • Fever, chills
  • Shock
  • Coma

Soma Addiction

There is a good reason for the guidance to only prescribe Soma for a short period of time. Soma is very habit forming, as the giddy, euphoric effects are attractive for some who may want to continue experiencing this sensation. Other people simply procure this drug on the street, known as Da, Dance, and Las Vegas Cocktail (when used with Vicodin). Individuals with an opiate addiction may use Soma as an alternative drug. Soma impacts the GABA receptors in the brain, which triggers a flood of dopamine and a reward response in the brain.

Because tolerance to this drug escalates rapidly, the need to use increasing amounts of it can quickly evolve into addiction. Signs of Soma addiction include:

  • Obsessed with obtaining and using Soma
  • Mood swings
  • Doctor shopping
  • Obtaining the drug illicitly
  • Continue to abuse Soma regardless of the consequences
  • Lie to others about how much Soma is being taken
  • Declining performance at work
  • Changes in sleeping patterns
  • Low energy
  • Social withdrawal
  • Attempts to stop taking Soma fail
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • When unavailable Soma addiction withdrawal symptoms emerge

Becoming addicted to Soma, or multiple drugs including Soma, will cause a steady decline in quality of life. If an addiction has developed, it is necessary to get help from an addiction recovery professional. The first step in recovery is the detox and withdrawal phase.

Soma Detox and Withdrawal

When someone has decided they are ready to tackle a Soma addiction and break free from its grip, they will have to first undergo the detox and withdrawal phase before beginning treatment. Soma detox is similar to benzodiazepine detox, meaning that it is necessary to slowly taper off of the drug rather than stop Soma cold turkey.

A medically supervised detox is the safest setting for detoxing from Soma. These detox programs offer personnel who are specifically trained to assist individuals through the withdrawal symptoms by providing medical and psychological support. Additionally, these detox specialists are prepared in the event of a medical emergency. With regard to Soma addiction withdrawal symptoms, serious reactions to absence of the drug might involve seizures or heart distress.

The first withdrawal symptoms emerge after 12-24 hours from the last dose of Soma. Severity of the symptoms will be dependent on the length of Soma abuse history, the amount of consumption, whether there is polydrug abuse, the age of the person, and their general health status.

Soma addiction withdrawal symptoms might include:

  • Muscle twitching
  • Ataxia
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Hallucinations
  • Delusions
  • Seizures

Throughout the detox process the medical detox team will continue to monitor vital signs and offer medications to help relief discomfort and pain. Emotional counseling is provided as needed to help the individual successfully endure the detox and transition into treatment.

Soma Addiction Treatment

Even though the detox process will rid the body of the drug that is simply not enough. The engrained addiction behaviors that keep the individual reaching for the Soma must be conquered and changed for there to be lasting recovery. Addiction treatment is the program that guides individuals through the process of making fundamental changes in the way they think and behave, which can then alter their need or desire for drugs.

For an addiction treatment program to be successful it must contain various treatment elements that are designed to work in tandem. Some individuals will respond better to group therapy, some will benefit from holistic therapies, and others may find that addiction education helps them finally understand. Because each person is wired differently, a quality treatment program will include a menu of different interventions that will hopefully resonate with various individuals in recovery.

A comprehensive Soma addiction treatment program includes:

  • Evidence-based psychotherapy. An evidence-based approach to therapy means that the methods have been clinically studied and research has indicated that they are indeed effective for treating a particular disorder, such as addiction. For Soma addiction, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most effective of these proven methods. CBT works well for substance use disorders because it guides the individual toward replacing dysfunctional thought and behavior patterns with healthy ones, becoming an effective coping tool in recovery.
  • Group therapy. Some individuals are more comfortable opening up in a small group of peers than in a one-on-one therapy session. A clinician who provides topics related to sobriety and overcoming addictive behaviors, guides the group sessions. These meetings enable participants to bond, providing the peer support so important in treatment.
  • Family therapy. Many times, a Soma addiction has impacted not only the individual but the whole family. In family-focused groups, loved ones are guided toward better communication skills, setting healthy boundaries, and having realistic expectations for their loved one in recovery.
  • Dual diagnosis. Addiction often is accompanied by a mental health disorder, which is referred to as a dual diagnosis. If so, the individual will need a program that is proficient in treating both disorders simultaneously for optimal recovery outcomes.
  • 12-step programming. Recovery communities, such as AA or NA, can provide an extra layer of social support, as well as accountability. Attending these meetings has been shown to contribute to higher rates of sustained sobriety.
  • Nutrition and exercise. Addiction can take a toll on the body and the mind, so engaging in restorative activities is key in recovery. A quality rehab will place importance on clients getting regular exercise, as well as consuming a nutritious diet.
  • Holistic elements. To help bridge the mind-body connection in recovery, holistic activities have been shown to be useful. These activities help individuals learn how to quiet the mind and decompress, which can help reduce the risk of relapse. Holistic activities might include yoga, massage, and meditation.
  • Aftercare services. One sign of a high quality rehab program is the attention they pay to aftercare. The first several months following completion of a program is critical to long-term success, so accessing these services is key. These include alumni meetings, outpatient group therapy, individual therapy when needed, participation in ongoing recovery community meetings, and even sober living housing.

With commitment and patience, a Soma addiction can be overcome and one’s quality of life restored.

Ken Seeley Communities Treats Soma Addiction in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities provides top-level addiction recovery services including medical detox for Soma addiction withdrawal symptoms. Ken Seeley became known through his appearances on A&E’s Intervention series as a professional interventionist. He then founded Ken Seeley Communities, which is an addiction treatment complex located in beautiful Palm Springs, California.

Ken Seeley Communities offers all aspects of addiction recovery, including professional intervention services, medical detox, outpatient rehab, residential treatment, and sober living housing. Ken Seeley Communities sees addiction recovery on a continuum, with each phase of the process leading organically to the next. Alumni are provided with excellent continuing care options to help reinforce recovery for a sustained and successful outcome. For more information about the various programs, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

effects of coming off alcohol

Managing the Effects of Coming Off Alcohol with Residential Detox

If only there was a way to magically bypass the detox and withdrawal phase of recovery. But until some brilliant inventor creates a magic pill that can allow a person to leapfrog over the suffering of detox, there is the detox, an absolute necessity when alcohol is the substance involved.

It is widely understood that people with an alcohol dependency who want to enter recovery should undergo a supervised detox. There is good reason for this guidance, as the effects of coming off alcohol can produce highly unpredictable, even dangerous, symptoms. Trained detox specialists are prepared to intervene should such symptoms arise and result in an emergency.

About Alcoholism

Alcoholism continues to lead the rehab admissions in America. While the opioid crisis has captured the national headlines, in reality alcohol addiction represents 80% of the individuals suffering from a substance use disorder, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Alliance.

There is a strong genetic component to the disease, with over 50% of Americans having a family history of alcoholism. In addition to genetics, neuroscience research is beginning to identify the chemical effects of alcohol on the brain structures. Using MRI and PET imaging, scientists are able to literally see the impact of alcoholism on the human brain.  According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a method called event-related potentials (ERP) has allowed researchers to identify markers that appear in the brains of alcoholics and their children, becoming a useful tool for identifying individuals at risk for alcoholism.

Other potential risk factors for developing an alcohol use disorder include alcohol being introduced at an early age, psychological factors, such as a co-occurring mental health disorder, poorly formed coping skills or a lack of resilience, or stressful life events.

Importance of a Residential Detox

All too often, someone wrestling with an alcohol dependency may hit a low point and impulsively decide to stop drinking on his or her own. Attempting to undergo alcohol detox alone is a serious mistake, as sudden, unpredictable acute withdrawal symptoms can emerge, requiring immediate assessment. Detox specialists possess the training to quickly intervene should severe withdrawal symptoms suddenly occur.

During a residential detox, a specially trained detox team will have the client’s intake data available that can prepare them for any potential problem. This information helps to alert the detox team if there is a health condition or a history of acute withdrawal syndrome. Throughout the detox process the team will monitor the client’s vital signs so they can identify any serious symptoms.

The delirium tremens (DTs) is a very serious development that constitutes a emergency. While the DTs only affect a small percentage of individuals going through alcohol detox, the mortality rate for those who do is about 5%-15%, the need for attention should it emerge is essential. Symptoms of the DTs include severe mental confusion, tremors, fever, high blood pressure, hallucinations, and seizures.

During the detox process, specialists will administer medications as needed to dramatically reduce many of the common alcohol withdrawal symptoms, as well as provide emotional support. The goal of a residential detox is to use interventions to guide the client safely through the withdrawals with the least amount of discomfort, while preparing the individual to transition into the treatment phase of recovery.

Factors that Influence Withdrawal Severity

Certain factors can determine the level of severity of the withdrawal symptoms, which can range from mild alcohol withdrawal symptoms to severe. These factors include:

  • Length of history of the alcohol use disorder
  • The level of alcohol consumed daily
  • Having a history of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS)
  • Age of individual
  • A coexisting mental health disorder
  • General health status of individual

Withdrawal Symptoms and Detox Timeline

Alcohol detox needs to be viewed as a necessary step in achieving freedom from alcohol addiction. It is the gatekeeper to recovery, so it must be endured before one can proceed into addiction treatment. Detox is the most unpleasant part of recovery, where the body attempts to adjust to the sudden absence of alcohol, something that results in unpleasant physical withdrawal symptoms that begin within 6-12 hours. Again, alcohol detox should only be attempted under the care and supervision by a detox team.

In most cases, withdrawal symptoms will be unpleasant, but not life threatening. However, for someone with a long history of excessive alcohol consumption or other risk factors, serious complications can arise. Withdrawal symptoms generally fall into one of two categories based on the severity of the alcohol addiction or dependency.

Common Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Sweating
  • Tremors of the hands
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Agitation or irritability
  • Depression
  • Insomnia

Severe Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Fever
  • Body shakes
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Nightmares
  • Depression
  • Hallucinations
  • Severe mental confusion
  • Seizures
  • Death

Alcohol detox occurs in three stages—the emergent stage, the peak stage, and the subsiding stage—and is typically completed within 7 days.

Managing the Effects of Coming Off Alcohol

While the unavoidable effects of coming off alcohol is an unpleasant one, here are some methods that can help to minimize the discomfort:

  • Hydrate. While the body is detoxing electrolyte levels can benefit from drinking fluids, which helps combat nausea and dehydration.
  • Distract. Depending on the severity of the withdrawal symptoms, it may help if you can take a walk, take a brisk shower, listen to music or a podcast, or watch TV.
  • Eat healthy. Increase the intake of fresh fruits and vegetables to help balance blood sugar levels.
  • Holistic. Try deep breathing techniques, aromatherapy using oils that reduce cravings and help with detoxification, a YouTube yoga class, or a meditation app.

Riding out the detox process is just that, so brace yourself for waves of cravings that will soon dissipate, remind yourself of the reasons you seek sobriety, and know that the detox process is a very short-lived inconvenience.

Treatment for Alcoholism

After detox is completed, a structured addiction treatment program will guide individuals through the process of changing disordered addiction-related behaviors and habits. Recovering from alcoholism requires an extended period of treatment to replace those self-destructive patterns and acquire new behaviors and recovery skills that help support sobriety. Rehab is available in an outpatient format, which is appropriate for mild to moderate alcohol use disorder, or a residential format, which is appropriate for moderate to severe alcoholism.

While in treatment the individual will participate in a variety of treatment activities and therapies that approach all angles of recovery, including:

  • Psychotherapy. Individual therapy, using various evidence-based psychotherapies, helps the individual work through any underlying emotional issues or past traumas that may be a factor in the alcoholism.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy. CBT guides individuals toward adopting new thought and behavior patterns that replace the disordered patterns that have culminated in alcohol abuse through addict behaviors.
  • Group therapy. Group sessions offer peers in recovery opportunities to share about their personal experiences and challenges, fostering an essential source of mutual peer support.
  • Family-based therapy. Family-focused therapy helps family members process their frustrations, mend hurt feelings, and discuss the fears around the disease of alcoholism and how it has impacted the family.
  • Relapse prevention planning. Each individual will examine his or her unique triggers or stressors that could potentially disrupt recovery and lead to a relapse.
  • Meetings. 12-step meetings, or some form of alternative programming, can provide additional social support, as well as opportunities for establishing new sober friendships.
  • Holistic therapies. There are complementary therapies, such as yoga classes, massage therapy, acupuncture, mindfulness training, and art therapy that can help the individual in recovery regulate stress.
  • Nutritional counseling and exercise.  Establishing new lifestyle habits that are focused on wellness are incorporated into the program to help promote physical and psychological healing.

Life in Recovery

Taking that first step is momentous, putting you on the path to reclaiming your life and fulfilling the dreams that had been lost in the fog of addiction. Life will begin to improve in a multitude of ways, especially following that first year of recovery. But even in that first year of adjusting to a sober lifestyle, improvements in sleep quality, your physical appearance, energy, cognitive and memory functions, and overall mood will spur you to stick tight to the plan. Stay in outpatient therapy, participate in a recovery community, and try sober living if the home environment is not supportive to your recovery goals. Do whatever it takes because life is so worth the effort.

Ken Seeley Communities Alcohol Recovery Program in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities is a leader in the field of addiction recovery. Founder Ken Seeley is a renowned professional interventionist who was a staple on the A&E series, Intervention. His recovery complex includes all facets of the recovery continuum, including intervention services, detox, outpatient rehab programming, residential rehab programming, and sober living housing. If you are ready to tackle the effects of coming off alcohol in a safe, supportive environment, please reach out to our team at (877) 744-0502.

 

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Suboxone

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Buprenorphine?

Buprenorphine can be a lifesaver for individuals recovering from an opioid addiction or dependency. This medication helps to block the effects of opioids, allowing for a gradual reduction in cravings to return to the drug. Meanwhile, the individual has more time to adjust to a life of sobriety and solidify recovery.

Some detox medications can work very well as a short, or sometimes long-term, medication to prevent opioid or opiate relapse.  For some, however, certain detox medications can be and prone to abuse and addiction itself.

Because Buprenorphine is itself a mild opioid, the dangers of dependency can emerge with long-term use. These long-term effects were not foreseen back in 2002 when the FDA approved. Because of a long 37-hour half-life, Buprenorphine is subject to building up in the system, contributing to the risk of potential chemical dependency.

Not all Buprenorphine addiction develop as a result of being prescribed the medication for recovery assistance. Some individuals access the drug illicitly and use it as a substance of abuse. Whether the Buprenorphine was legitimately provided or used as a recreational drug, the result of addiction or dependency will require a detox and treatment to overcome. This prompts the important question, “What are the withdrawal symptoms of Buprenorphine as someone anticipates the detox and withdrawal process.

How Buprenorphine Addiction or Dependency Develops

As with any other mind-altering substance, Buprenorphine can be abused. Indeed, addiction behaviors do die hard. When someone is being treated for an opioid dependency with Buprenorphine they may become tempted to begin abusing this medication. Some may choose to inject the drug, or snort it, in an effort to experience a high. Over time, the compulsive abuse of Buprenorphine can develop into a new addiction. When the individual uses Buprenorphine for an extended period of time, their brain adapts to the regular influx of the drug to the point where it is unable to function normally without Buprenorphine.

Symptoms of Buprenorphine Addiction

When someone is struggling with an addiction to Buprenorphine they will begin to exhibit the classic signs of drug addiction. Buprenorphine is an opioid, so there are the telltale sights of opioid abuse such as:

  • Escalating tolerance to the drug’s effects, leading to higher consumption of the drug
  • Doctor shopping to obtain additional prescriptions
  • Purchasing the Buprenorphine off the street or the Internet
  • Paraphernalia related to injecting the drug, such as needles, syringes, a white powdery substance, ropes or tubing to constrict blood flow
  • Loss of interest in recovery efforts once made. Not attending meetings as much or at all, hanging out with old pre-rehab friends, keeping odd hours
  • Neglect of personal hygiene
  • Loss of interest in activities and hobbies once enjoyed
  • Financial struggles due to missing work, spending excessive amounts of money on the drug, legal problems. They may steal money from their loved ones or ask friends for money
  • Loss of weight. Buprenorphine addiction can lead to loss of appetite, neglecting nutrition, skipping meals and subsequent weight loss

There are also physical signs of Buprenorphine abuse. These include nausea and vomiting, dilated pupils, tearing of the eyes, impaired speech, fainting, sweating, muscle aches, sleep problems, and drowsiness.

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Buprenorphine?

Once chemically dependent, if the individual attempts to cease taking the drug, they will experience withdrawal symptoms. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, which means that trying to stop it will trigger the same types of withdrawal symptoms of most other opiates.  The withdrawal symptoms will vary from mild to severe based on the length of history using Buprenorphine the level of dosing, and the mode used to administer the drug.

Buprenorphine detox and withdrawal is said to last longer than other opioids because it is chemically designed to block cravings for an extended period of time, meaning that it remains in bodily tissues longer. So, what are the withdrawal symptoms of Buprenorphine?

Withdrawal symptoms begin approximately 6-12 hours after the last Buprenorphine dose and include:

  • Nausea
  • Muscle aches
  • Insomnia
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Diarrhea
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Cravings
  • Mood swings

Many of these withdrawal symptoms, such as the gastrointestinal distress, fever, headache, and muscle ache, can be managed using simple over-the-counter medications by the detox team.

Why a Detox is Important for Buprenorphine

Monitoring is important during a Buprenorphine. No one should attempt to just quit the Buprenorphine. Instead, professional oversight where a doctor can prescribe a tapering program can help minimize withdrawal severity and successfully complete the detox. This, however, means that a Buprenorphine detox may last up to a month for the most severe addictions. Patience is required in order to safely progress through the detox phase to completion. Individuals who attempt to stop cold turkey are likely to quickly relapse back to Buprenorphine use as the highly unpleasant symptoms would be difficult to endure.

Depression and cravings may persist for a month or more, which makes the individual at risk for relapse and suicidal ideation. The  detox team will provide relief for the physical symptoms, as well as offer psychological aid to help manage feelings of depression and anxiety.

Holistic Therapies that Aid Buprenorphine Detox and Withdrawal

Natural therapies can aid in restoring health while promoting stress reduction during a Buprenorphine detox. There is much evidence that experiential and holistic therapies can help reduce the discomforts of withdrawing from opioids, and are very useful in ongoing aftercare and relapse prevention following treatment. Some of the holistic therapies used for a Buprenorphine detox acupuncture, yoga, and meditation. These activities can enhance recovery by regulating stress, as well as provide avenues to self-discovery that might be useful in subsequent addiction recovery.

Addiction Recovery Treatment for Buprenorphine Dependency

After the Buprenorphine detox and withdrawal process is completed, the individual will segue into an addiction treatment program. This is an integral component needed for moving beyond addictive behaviors and into healthy, productive ones that will help sustain recovery from opioids.

Treatment for a Buprenorphine addiction may be provided in an outpatient setting or a residential setting. The outpatient programs will offer several levels of intensity. In most cases of opioid addiction if outpatient treatment is desired the most intensive level is appropriate. This is the partial hospitalization program (PHP), also referred to as a day program, which requires daily participation in various therapeutic sessions throughout the week. The PHP involves 25-30 hours per week of participation in the therapy and education elements, but provides the flexibility to reside at home during the program. This allows someone who is not able to take an extended leave from family obligations to still obtain the treatment they need following detox.

The residential program involves a long-term commitment of 1-9 months. During the residential program, the individual will reside at the treatment center and participate in a wide variety of treatment elements daily. These programs provide structure and constant support, while allowing the individual to remove themselves from their usual home environment to be able to focus completely on recovery.

What to Expect in Buprenorphine Recovery Treatment

Most addiction recovery programs, whether it is an outpatient or residential format, will provide fundamental treatment elements to aid the individual in overcoming a Buprenorphine addiction. These treatment elements include:

  • Psychotherapy sessions. These therapy sessions are conducted one-on-one with a licensed psychotherapist who will assist the individual in identifying key addictive behaviors and patterns. Once these are noted, the therapist will use evidence-based therapies to guide the individual toward adopting more positive and productive thought and behavior patterns in recovery.
  • Peer group sessions. Group therapy involves a small collection of peers who can discuss openly topics related to overcoming addiction. The therapist will provide the topics and facilitate discussions so they are productive and supportive.
  • Education. Addiction education is key to the overall success of the treatment program. In these classes, individuals learn about how opioid addiction develops, and then are taught recovery tools that can help them avoid relapse.
  • Other activities. In a residential program there will be a focus on nutrition and fitness, both important to restoring health and wellness in recovery.
  • Continuing care. Once the treatment program is completed, continuing care services should be accessed for the best chance at obtaining a lasting recovery. These include outpatient counseling, sober living housing, and attending recovery meetings.

Ken Seeley Communities Provides Buprenorphine Detox Services

Ken Seeley Communities is a integrated addiction recovery program located in California. At Ken Seeley Communities, our philosophy for recovery from addiction or chemical dependency to Buprenorphine is centered on a transformational spectrum of treatment elements. This involves the initial residential detoxification process, participation in addiction recovery therapies, and continuing care services such as sober living and outpatient programming to help reinforce sobriety. When wondering what are the withdrawal symptoms of Buprenorphine, please contact our team for a thorough explanation of the detox and withdrawal process at (877) 744-0502.

lgbt friendly treatment centers

LGBT Friendly Treatment Centers

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender have unique life issues related to their gender identification. Many still, even in our modern society, face open hostility or discrimination on a daily basis. Many who identify as LGBT encounter roadblocks in their careers, strife in their family relationships, and open contempt in their communities. The constant scrutiny only adds emotional pain to an already difficult road to hoe.

It comes as no surprise that the rates of drug and alcohol addiction are more prevalent in the LGBT population. According to data collected by the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Substances, adults who identify as bisexual or gay were more than twice as likely as straight adults to use illicit drugs, while those who identify as lesbian are twice as likely as straight women to have an alcohol use disorder.

Dual diagnosis, or the existence of co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders, is also more common among the LGBT population. Higher rates of mental distress are reported among the community, which may result in the abuse of substances as a way to self-medicate the effects of emotional suffering.

There are, thankfully, LGBT friendly treatment centers that provide specialized programs that address the particular needs of this population. When in need of help for addiction recovery, a program designed for individuals with an alternative sexual orientation may feel more welcoming and supportive. A gay-friendly rehab program will likely be more effective overall, due to the increased level of acceptance and support that is offered. In turn, clients will be more engaged in their recovery efforts.

Issues That May Contribute to Addiction in LBGT Individuals

Although the stigma associated with alternative lifestyles has greatly diminished, discrimination does still exist. The LGBT community often comes up against those who express blatant prejudice and even contempt for them and their chosen sexual identity, creating special social challenges that the LGBT community must grapple with on a daily basis.

In addition to cultural or societal issues that afflict members of the LGBT community, there are some deeply personal issues that not only complicate their daily life but also cause emotional strife. This emotional turmoil is sometimes a factor in developing a substance use disorder.

Sources of emotional pain that LGBT individuals struggle with include:

  • Gender dysphoria.  Although born of a particular biological gender, individuals who struggle with gender dysphoria do not identifying with that biological gender assignment, and suffer due to this disconnect. Gender nonconformity, referred to as transgender, can cause significant mental distress as well as impairment in daily functioning. The internal struggle may lead to the individual to adapt through cross-dressing, social transitioning, or through a sex change process.
  • Bullying.  Another source of emotional suffering is bullying or ridicule in the workplace or at school because of sexual orientation. Harassment or verbal assault can lead to depression, anxiety, declining work or academic performance, health conditions, and suicidal ideation. Sadly, bullying, physical assault, and harassment are extremely common for LGBT individuals. LGTB youth in particular are at a significantly higher risk of suicidal ideation as a result of enduring chronic bullying.
  • Coming out.  In many cases, an individual may have attempted to conform to family or societal expectations and hidden their gender identity for a period of some time. The difficulties associated with ‘coming out of the closet,’ the important step of disclosing one’s authentic sexual orientation to loved ones, can be a source of great distress. The coming out process is an ongoing one, usually the result of multiple situations that lead to revealing the truth to loved ones. Some may face rejection by coworkers, friends, or family members as a result of coming out. Depression, anxiety, and substance abuse are potential consequences that may accompany the coming out process.
  • Social rejection. Discrimination against LBGT individuals still exists. Being rejected by others due to one’s sexuality can result in feelings of shame, guilt, and loneliness. Social rejection can lead to unhealthy isolating behaviors, substance abuse, eating disorders, depleted wellness, and depression. Being concerned about one’s personal safety is another valid issue for LGBT individuals, as homophobia can result in violence against the gay or transgender individual. Establishing community ties and safe spaces within the LGBT community serves as a protective factor.

Benefits of an LGBT Friendly Treatment Center

Finding a supportive rehabilitative setting that is not biased or judgmental is important to anyone who seeks treatment for a substance use disorder. It is even more important to those who identity as LGBT who face bias and discrimination on a daily basis. For rehab to be effective for those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender, it must be accepting and free from hurtful prejudice that only becomes triggering, working against the purpose of going to rehab in the first place.

A treatment program that is LGBT friendly will provide a compassionate environment where the clinical staff is trained in the specific issues this population faces in daily life. They will also be familiar with managing the hormonal treatment regimens some individuals may be prescribed. Therapists will be familiar with providing guidance for specific challenges, such as how to proceed with coming out to family members, or how to manage responses to open prejudice that is experienced.

What to Expect in Addiction Treatment

The actual treatment program for LGBT individuals will be virtually the same as in the heterosexual rehab programs. Industry standards, best practices, and evidence-based approaches guide all quality rehab programs, regardless of the unique features of the clients. Treatment programs should be structured, supportive, and safe. Treatment will include the following elements:

  • Intake process. The initial intake process involves a detailed interview and other assessment techniques that helps the clinician to ascertain a specific diagnosis. This will also include a psychological assessment to identify if there is a co-occurring mental health disorder. A physical exam is usually included in this initial step. From this data the clinical staff can design an individualized treatment protocol and set recovery goals.
  • Residential Detox. Many individuals entering rehab will first have to complete the detox process. This involves several days during which the body is eliminating the remaining toxins or chemicals of the substance. During detox the client will be closely monitored, allowing for the detox team to intervene with medications and other measures that help reduce the discomfort of withdrawal symptoms.
  • Addiction treatment. The treatment portion of rehab focuses on guiding the client toward making fundamental changes in their behavior patterns. Clients will participate in a variety of therapeutic activities, including:
    • Individual therapy
    • Group therapy
    • Family therapy
    • Classes that teach recovery skills
    • 12-step meetings
    • Medication-assisted treatment
    • Holistic therapies
    • Recreational therapy
    • Nutritional counseling
  • Aftercare. Once the treatment program has been successfully completed, the client will begin accessing aftercare services. This is an important phase of recovery that helps to solidify the techniques learned in rehab during the early months following treatment. Aftercare measures include:
    • Outpatient therapy
    • Participation in a recovery community
    • Sober living

Dual Diagnosis for LGBT Individuals

LGBT often have a co-occurring mental health issue, such as depression or anxiety. Therapists who are trained and experienced in effectively treating the issues unique to LGBT individuals are essential in a dual diagnosis rehab program. This is important because a therapist who themselves is prejudiced, or even just ignorant of the challenges faced by LGBT individuals, will not be effective in their efforts to counsel.

While many of the life events and issues that people seek help for are universal, such as relationship problems, addiction issues, family discord, or mood disorders, there are also unique issues specific to the LGBT community. The dual diagnosis program should have a highly trained clinical staff that is knowledgeable about these specific problems.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment at an LGBT Friendly Treatment Center

A dual diagnosis can create a more complicated clinical picture, necessitating a specialized program that includes psychiatric services. It is widely held that to achieve the best long-term recovery outcome, both disorders—the substance use disorder and the mental health disorder—must be treated together. If the rehab program is not equipped to treat a co-occurring mental health disorder the chances of achieving a sustained recovery are minimal. This is because the mental health issue may be directly connected to the substance use.

Dual diagnosis often involves medication for managing the mental health disorder. These might include antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, or mood stabilizers. Because a dual diagnosis has a psychiatrist on staff, these medications can be incorporated into the treatment plan.

Psychotherapy is a core treatment element in dual diagnosis. The type of psychotherapy approach is determined by the specific mental health disorder. Many clinicians employ the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating minority stress and a variety of mental health issues surrounding the LBGT lifestyle. CBT is a short-term therapy that can be adapted for many different mental health needs. Other therapies may include dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), Motivational Interviewing, and Interpersonal Therapy.

Ken Seeley Communities LGBT Friendly Treatment Centers Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities offers a welcoming and compassionate vibe to individuals who identify as LGBT. The expert clinical team is well acquainted with the unique features of addiction that affect individuals with an alternative sexual orientation, and is highly trained to help them in their recovery journey.

Ken Seeley Communities provides a fully integrative program, from intervention services to residential detox, addiction treatment, aftercare, and sober living resources. Clients experience a full spectrum of care at Ken Seeley, allowing for a seamless transition between each phase of recovery. For more details about our program, please contact our team at (877) 744-0502.

how to stop taking codeine

How to Stop Taking Codeine Safely

Who would ever suspect that an innocent bottle of cough syrup could be problematic? But the reality is that contained in that prescription cough medication is an opioid called codeine. Codeine misuse may start through the legitimate clinical use of the cough suppressant, or it could result from recreation use known on the street as Lean, Purple Drank, Sizzurp, and Texas Tea.

Regardless of the origin of the codeine abuse it can lead to increased tolerance, escalation of dosing, and ultimately addiction. Once someone has decided they are ready to stop using codeine there is a knee-jerk impulse to abruptly stop using it. However, just as with all opioid dependency, it is important to understand how to stop taking codeine safely.

About Codeine Addiction

Codeine is derived from the poppy plant and has been used for medical treatment for 200 years. Although codeine is available as a stand-alone prescription analgesic in pill form, it is often combined with other ingredients. These medications may include other pain relievers such as Tylenol or promethazine and is available in pill, capsule, or liquid forms. Codeine-containing medications are used to treat a variety of symptoms, including cough, diarrhea, and low-level pain. Codeine is a Schedule II substance, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse, which could result in addiction or dependence. In combination medications containing 90 milligrams or less of codeine, the classification is Schedule III, designating a slightly lower risk of abuse.

Codeine abuse tends to be most prominent among young, urban males. Rappers have added to the allure of the concoctions created using codeine, only increasing the popularity of codeine abuse. The drug acts by blocking pain signals to the brain, acting much the same way as morphine does. In fact, a portion of the codeine is converted by the body into morphine in approximately 70% of those who use the drug.

Effects of Codeine Abuse

As with other opioids, the body will become more tolerant to the drug’s effects, prompting the individual to begin using heavier doses. Over time, the drug may be combined with other substances, such as benzos or alcohol, to achieve the desired high, and in some cases switching to more potent opioids.

While the initial effect of the drug is relaxation, pain relief, and mild euphoria, prolonged use will begin to cause side effects. These might include:

  • Itching or rash
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Shallow breathing
  • Mental confusion
  • Problems urinating
  • Lowered blood pressure
  • Delirium and hallucination
  • Seizures

When codeine abuse escalates it can depress the central nervous system, dangerously slowing the respiratory rate. Risk of overdose death is increased if the codeine is used with alcohol, which could cause respiratory failure.

Different Forms of Recreational Codeine

Detoxing From Codeine

Knowing how to stop taking codeine in a safe manner is essential when deciding to get clean and sober. There is a risk of experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms if the drug is abruptly stopped, so detoxification should only be accomplished through a residential detox. These residential detox programs will create a tapering schedule that will ease the person off the codeine safely, allowing the body to adjust.

While withdrawal symptoms can be somewhat regulated through tapering, some unpleasant symptoms are unavoidable. These symptoms will be managed through medications and treatments that will help minimize discomfort.

Codeine withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Extreme irritability
  • Agitation
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue, malaise

Treatment For Codeine Abuse

The fact is that, over time, certain addictive behaviors became habit. The mind is a powerful instrument in relaying thoughts that would lead the individual to reach for the codeine. To overcome the codeine addiction or dependency, it is critical to make changes in thought/behavior patterns. Without making these core shifts in thinking and reacting, cravings for the drug, or ingrained addictive thought processes, would simply drive the person right back into using codeine.

After detox is completed, a rehab program will help the person accomplish these fundamental changes using cognitive behavioral therapy as an essential tool. Therapy will be offered in one-on-one settings as well as group settings, and combined with other treatment elements, such as detox treatment, 12-step meetings, and relapse prevention planning.

Ken Seeley Communities Treats Codeine Abuse and Addiction

Ken Seeley Communities offers detox, rehab, and sober living services for treating codeine addiction in California. Because codeine addiction follows the same trajectory as any other opioid addiction, it is helpful to understand how to stop taking codeine through a tapering schedule. This allows the detoxification process to go smoother, increasing the chances of successfully completing detox and then transitioning into treatment. Treatment can be received through either an outpatient or residential program, depending on the severity of the codeine addiction. Ken Seeley Communities offers compassionate support at every juncture of the recovery process. For more details about the program, please reach out to Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

How Long Does Opiate Withdrawal Last?

Recovery from an opiate addiction or dependency is a multi-phased process that begins with an individual agreeing to get professional help. Whether they arrived at this realization after hitting their bottom, or by being encouraged by loved ones in an intervention doesn’t matter. All that really matters is beginning the recovery journey that will save someone’s life.

In anticipation of the dreaded detox from opiates, one may ask, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” This is an expected question, as anyone with an opiate addiction knows full well what “dope sick” feels like. Just knowing they will have to endure days of discomfort is something that can cause anxiety and even second thoughts about going into treatment.

But knowledge is power. Being somewhat prepared for not only how long does the opiate withdrawal last, but also what to expect in rehab and beyond, can help to form a mental picture of the recovery process. Envisioning the steps that one will be moving through can help to muster courage and feel a little more in control.

What Is Involved in the Recovery Process?

Addiction recovery is a lifelong process that begins with the moment someone agrees to get needed help. Once that important decision has been made, it is time to seek out a treatment program that will align with the individual’s personal preferences, specific addiction features, resources, and mental health needs. There are different types of rehabs, as well as different levels of care, accommodations, and types of services.

Once a program has been selected, there will be an extensive intake process conducted. During the intake evaluation, the individual will participate in an interview with a clinician. This interview will allow the individual to relay the specific details about their opiate addiction history, any co-occurring mental health disorder, and any physical conditions. Clinicians may use assessment tools to help them further determine the new client’s recovery needs.

The rehab program will commence starting with detoxification, followed by an extensive addiction treatment program with intensive therapy, group therapy, and related activities. Once the rehab program is completed, the client should access continuing care services that include outpatient therapy and 12-step meetings at minimum.

Residential Detox for Opiate Addiction

Many clients are curious and ask, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” They may be apprehensive about going through detox and need some reassurance prior to beginning the process. The detox and withdrawal process lasts about one to two weeks in most cases.

During a residential detox individuals will be well attended to. The withdrawal symptoms, which are similar to a bad flu with the added features of psychological symptoms, begin to emerge within 12 hours of the last opiate dosing, peak on days 2-4, and then begin to incrementally subside. During the detox and withdrawal phase of treatment, the detox team will provide medications and other remedies to help ease the discomfort and pain caused by the withdrawal symptoms. So, as worried as a client might be when they inquire, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” they may be surprised to find that it is over before they know it.

Rehab for Opiate Addiction

Treatment for the opiate addiction includes multiple treatment interventions. These include:

  • One-on-one psychotherapy sessions based primarily on CBT
  • Group therapy
  • Family-based counseling
  • 12-step programming
  • Addiction education
  • Relapse prevention strategizing
  • Motivational guest speakers
  • Adjunctive services, such as yoga classes, mindfulness meditation training, art therapy, or other holistic therapies
  • Medication management

Rehab is available in various outpatient formats or residential, determined largely by the severity of the addiction, whether a client can leave work for an extended period, and the client’s resources.

Outpatient Treatment and Continuing Care

Continuing care refers to the post-rehab services or activities that can help bolster recovery, especially during the first six months of recovery when clients are most vulnerable. Continuing care might include sober living housing for a few months, continuing on with weekly outpatient therapy, and attending 12-step meetings. All of these activities will help to reinforce early recovery while providing key sources of support.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers All Opiate Addiction Treatment Services

Ken Seeley Communities is a comprehensive addiction treatment program located in California. Ken Seeley is a renowned professional interventionist, featured on the A&E show, Intervention. Ken Seeley Communities offers the full spectrum of addiction treatment services, including intervention services, residential detoxification, addiction treatment (outpatient and residential), sober living housing, and continuing care services. Contact us with any questions regarding treatment for an opiate addiction, including, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” Our caring and knowledgeable team is happy to answer all questions. Reach out to us at (877) 744-0502.