alcohol and social anxiety

The Link Between Alcohol and Social Anxiety

When considering what may drive someone to use alcohol as a soothing panacea for managing mental health disorders it is helpful to gain a deeper understanding of the connection between social anxiety and alcohol abuse. It isn’t difficult to identify the causal nature of this link, considering the effects of social anxiety on a person. For individuals who suffer from social anxiety, the intense level of discomfort in social situations can lead to an array of physical symptoms. These include a racing heart, spiked cortisol and adrenaline production, palpitations, sweating, shaking, and nausea. Alcohol can behave as a very quick antidote to these symptoms, producing a calming, relaxing effect in moments.

But as with all substances that produce chemical changes in the brain, alcohol can create a whole host of additional problems on top of the social anxiety it is supposed to be helping. The partnership between alcohol and social anxiety becomes symbiotic, that is the effects of one enhance the effects of the other, as a vicious cycle. Alcohol abuse can enhance the anxiety symptoms, as well as contribute to depression and many negative consequences in one’s life.

Why Do Those With Social Anxiety Use Alcohol?

Someone with social anxiety disorder typically has an intense fear of social events and interactions. This can include fearing simple activities like eating a meal in public or something associated with an extreme fear of being judged, such as public speaking. It has been found that 20% of those who suffer from social anxiety disorder also present with a comorbid alcohol use disorder, according to the article by Book and Randall, “Social Anxiety Disorder and Alcohol Use.” Alcohol can help these individuals relax in social settings, reducing the anxiety symptoms associated with the social phobia.

For those who dread the prospect of being scrutinized or criticized publically, turning to alcohol can be the last thing they do before leaving the house. Self-medicating fears away is only going to provide a temporary Band-Aid as more and more of the substance will inevitably be needed to relax.

Signs of Alcohol Dependency

Alcohol dependency comes in stealthily, like a thief in the night attempting to rob one of everything they hold dear. While the alcohol started out as a crutch for managing social anxiety, over time increased tolerance resulted in higher levels of alcohol consumption. There are some specific signs that alcohol abuse has evolved into a disorder. These signs include:

  • Being unable to control the levels of alcohol consumption. No shut-off capability
  • Turn to alcohol first thing in the morning
  • Hiding alcohol in the house or at work, or lying about alcohol use
  • Neglecting responsibilities
  • Excessive absences from work or classes
  • Decline in work or academic performance
  • Obsess about getting alcohol, having enough on hand, anticipating drinking
  • Try to quit alcohol but cannot stop
  • Experience withdrawal symptoms when try to quit

Treatment for Social Anxiety

Treating social anxiety will involved a combination of targeted psychotherapy and the use of medication. The psychotherapy best suited for treating social anxiety disorder is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). In addition, exposure therapies are also helpful in assisting individuals in overcoming their fear of social situations.

Antidepressants such as Paxil or Zoloft may be effective in managing the symptoms of social anxiety disorder. In addition, other types of antidepressants, such as the SNRI venlafaxine (Effexor XR) has been shown to be effective for this anxiety disorder. Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax or Valium may also help reduce feelings of anxiety in a stressful situation, however these drugs have a high propensity for abuse and addiction.

Treatment for an Alcohol Use Disorder

When seeking help for an alcohol use disorder the first step in the process of recovery will be the detoxification process. Alcohol detox should always be conducted in the safe and supportive medical detox environment. Alcohol detox can suddenly introduce serious health risks, such as seizures or the delirium tremens, so detox should never be done without appropriate supervision.

Once the detox is completed, it is time to transition to treatment for the alcohol and social anxiety disorders. Both disorders should be treated simultaneously using psychotherapy, such as CBT and motivational enhancement therapy, medication, 12-step programming, and adjunctive activities that can enhance the conventional treatments. These might include recreational therapy, mindfulness, EMDR therapy, yoga, and hypnotherapy.

Ken Seeley Communities Treats Dual Diagnosis in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities is an integrated alcohol and dual diagnosis treatment center serving Coachella Valley in California. At Ken Seeley Communities, great lengths are taken to match the needs of each individual client based on their particular substance of abuse or co-occurring mental health condition. For alcohol and social anxiety, a comprehensive approach to treating the co-occurring disorders would involve evidence-based therapies that are targeted toward social anxiety disorder. These include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and exposure-based therapies. The alcohol use disorder should be treated simultaneously for the best recovery outcome. For more information about our recovery services, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

ativan withdrawal

Detox Timeline For Ativan Withdrawal

Ativan (lorazepam) is a benzodiazepine drug that is prescribed primarily for treating anxiety and insomnia. This fast-acting sedative quickly induces a state of calm and deep relaxation by increasing GABA in the brain. Ativan is very effective and well tolerated with few adverse effects, making it a drug that is prone to abuse.

As with all benzodiazepines, Ativan is intended for short to intermediate term use, usually no more than four months. This is because the body will build up tolerance to it, causing the individual to increase their dosing to achieve the earlier effects. This can lead to someone becoming both psychologically and physically dependent on the drug.

When the refills are no longer approved the individual will know they are addicted because highly unpleasant Ativan withdrawal symptoms ensue in the absence of the drug. Benzodiazepines can cause serious, even life-threatening withdrawal symptoms, so any attempt to discontinue them after long-term use should be done under medical supervision.

What Are the Signs of Ativan Addiction?

There are some signs and symptoms that indicate that Ativan use or misuse is evolving into an addiction. These include:

  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite, anorexia
  • Tremors
  • Memory problems
  • Mental confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Over-sleeping
  • Using increasing amounts of Ativan, using Ativan as a crutch
  • Withdrawing from social activities
  • Loss of interest in usual hobbies
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Increased anxiety
  • Poor coordination
  • Drowsiness
  • Blurred vision
  • Breathing problems
  • Mood swings
  • Doctor shopping to obtain more Ativan
  • Experience withdrawal symptoms when Ativan is unavailable

Safest Way to Approach Ativan Withdrawal

Due to the possibility of dangerous withdrawal symptoms, it is never advisable to attempt Ativan detox cold turkey or alone without support. A medically monitored detox program will manage the psychological and physical withdrawal symptom, regularly checking vital signs. The detox doctor will put the individual on a tapering schedule to minimize the health risks, allowing the detox process to be completed safely. Withdrawal symptoms will ensure within 6 hours of the last dose of Ativan, and may include:

  • Severe nervousness
  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Profuse sweating
  • Dizziness
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Tremors
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle aches
  • Mood swings
  • Confusion
  • Cravings
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Hallucinations
  • Coma
  • Seizures

Round the clock supervision in a medical detox allows detox specialists to provide medications and psychological support to safely guide the individual through the detox and withdrawal process.

Detox Timeline for Ativan Withdrawal

The detox timeline and severity of withdrawal symptoms will depend on the length of time Ativan was abused, the usual daily dosage, if additional substances were abused, the general health of the individual, and whether there are any co-occurring mental health disorders present. A tapering program will help diffuse much of the intensity of the withdrawal symptoms.

The early withdrawal stage of detoxification involves increased blood pressure, increased heart rate, insomnia, and pronounced anxiety symptoms. The acute withdrawal stage starts around day 2-3 and may involve symptoms that last for up to two weeks. Symptoms might include tremors, cravings, muscle aches, irritability, nausea, confusion, sweating, and panic attacks. To date there is no drug to help mitigate withdrawal symptoms for an Ativan addiction.

Next Steps After Detox and Withdrawal

Once the medical detox is safely completed, the next phase of Ativan addiction recovery involves the active treatment phase. Without learning how to manage stress, triggers, and change habits, it is impossible to sustain recovery.

A rehab program can be obtained in an outpatient format or a residential format. Outpatient treatment offers three different intensities based on the history of the Ativan misuse and other factors. Outpatient programs provide more flexibility and they usually cost less than the residential programs.

However, sometimes the outpatient program does not provide enough structure, which can result in relapse. Some individuals do better in a residential program where there is 24-hour support. Whichever type of rehab format is selected, the fundamental treatment elements will be similar. These include:

  • Psychotherapy. Individual sessions allow for delving into past emotional pain, traumas, mental health conditions, current stressors, and help to process and heal these using evidence-based therapies. Clients learn how to reshape thought patterns so that new productive behavior patterns will replace the dependency on Ativan.
  • Group sessions. Group counseling and family counseling sessions are excellent opportunities to share your experiences with others who have similar challenges. This helps to foment peer support, which is helpful while going through addiction treatment as it makes participants feel they are not alone.
  • Addiction recovery tools. Rehab programs will equip the individual with the tools needed to avert any temptation to return to Ativan use. Relapse prevention planning and strategizing is a high priority in rehab.
  • 12-step programs. A.A.’s 12-step program is incorporated into many rehab programs to one degree or another. Meetings can be helpful to those in early recovery, offering a safe place to share and learn from each other.

Lifestyle Changes to Promote Relaxation

One of the most important goals of overcoming an addiction to Ativan or any benzo is to learn more healthy ways to calm the mind and settle down. Replacing the drug with stress-reducing activities, regular exercise, and healthy diets can help individuals in recovery refrain from needing the sedatives. These lifestyle changes might include:

  • Yoga
  • Mindfulness
  • Massage therapy
  • Acupuncture
  • Gardening therapy
  • Art therapy
  • Equine therapy
  • Journaling
  • Regular exercise
  • Guided meditation

All of these activities will promote relaxation while reducing stress, helping individuals manage anxiety without Ativan or any benzodiazepine.

Ken Seeley Communities Treats Ativan Addiction and Dependency

Ken Seeley Communities is a Palm Springs-based drug and alcohol recovery center. Our medical detox program helps clients achieve a safely guided detoxification process. These trained detox professionals assist clients by tapering them off the Ativan incrementally, significantly reducing the discomforts and dangers of Ativan withdrawal symptoms. Once detox is safely completed, the client will transition to the active treatment phase of recovery. Ken Seeley Communities provides the most current, evidence-based therapies and a highly attentive staff to guide the client into a solid, sustained recovery. For more information, please connect with our staff at Ken Seeley Communities by calling (877) 744-0502.

 

how to stop taking codeine

How to Stop Taking Codeine Safely

Who would ever suspect that an innocent bottle of cough syrup could be problematic? But the reality is that contained in that prescription cough medication is an opioid called codeine. Codeine misuse may start through the legitimate clinical use of the cough suppressant, or it could result from recreation use known on the street as Lean, Purple Drank, Sizzurp, and Texas Tea.

Regardless of the origin of the codeine abuse it can lead to increased tolerance, escalation of dosing, and ultimately addiction. Once someone has decided they are ready to stop using codeine there is a knee-jerk impulse to abruptly stop using it. However, just as with all opioid dependency, it is important to understand how to stop taking codeine safely.

About Codeine Addiction

Codeine is derived from the poppy plant and has been used for medical treatment for 200 years. Although codeine is available as a stand-alone prescription analgesic in pill form, it is often combined with other ingredients. These medications may include other pain relievers such as Tylenol or promethazine and is available in pill, capsule, or liquid forms. Codeine-containing medications are used to treat a variety of symptoms, including cough, diarrhea, and low-level pain. Codeine is a Schedule II substance, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse, which could result in addiction or dependence. In combination medications containing 90 milligrams or less of codeine, the classification is Schedule III, designating a slightly lower risk of abuse.

Codeine abuse tends to be most prominent among young, urban males. Rappers have added to the allure of the concoctions created using codeine, only increasing the popularity of codeine abuse. The drug acts by blocking pain signals to the brain, acting much the same way as morphine does. In fact, a portion of the codeine is converted by the body into morphine in approximately 70% of those who use the drug.

Effects of Codeine Abuse

As with other opioids, the body will become more tolerant to the drug’s effects, prompting the individual to begin using heavier doses. Over time, the drug may be combined with other substances, such as benzos or alcohol, to achieve the desired high, and in some cases switching to more potent opioids.

While the initial effect of the drug is relaxation, pain relief, and mild euphoria, prolonged use will begin to cause side effects. These might include:

  • Itching or rash
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Shallow breathing
  • Mental confusion
  • Problems urinating
  • Lowered blood pressure
  • Delirium and hallucination
  • Seizures

When codeine abuse escalates it can depress the central nervous system, dangerously slowing the respiratory rate. Risk of overdose death is increased if the codeine is used with alcohol, which could cause respiratory failure.

Different Forms of Recreational Codeine

Detoxing From Codeine

Knowing how to stop taking codeine in a safe manner is essential when deciding to get clean and sober. There is a risk of experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms if the drug is abruptly stopped, so detoxification should only be accomplished through a medically monitored detox program. These medical detox programs will create a tapering schedule that will ease the person off the codeine safely, allowing the body to adjust.

While withdrawal symptoms can be somewhat regulated through tapering, some unpleasant symptoms are unavoidable. These symptoms will be managed through medications and treatments that will help minimize discomfort.

Codeine withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Extreme irritability
  • Agitation
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue, malaise

Treatment For Codeine Abuse

The fact is that, over time, certain addictive behaviors became habit. The mind is a powerful instrument in relaying thoughts that would lead the individual to reach for the codeine. To overcome the codeine addiction or dependency, it is critical to make changes in thought/behavior patterns. Without making these core shifts in thinking and reacting, cravings for the drug, or ingrained addictive thought processes, would simply drive the person right back into using codeine.

After detox is completed, a rehab program will help the person accomplish these fundamental changes using cognitive behavioral therapy as an essential tool. Therapy will be offered in one-on-one settings as well as group settings, and combined with other treatment elements, such as Suboxone treatment, 12-step meetings, and relapse prevention planning.

Ken Seeley Communities Treats Codeine Abuse and Addiction

Ken Seeley Communities offers detox, rehab, and sober living services for treating codeine addiction in Palm Springs, California. Because codeine addiction follows the same trajectory as any other opioid addiction, it is helpful to understand how to stop taking codeine through a tapering schedule. This allows the detoxification process to go smoother, increasing the chances of successfully completing detox and then transitioning into treatment. Treatment can be received through either an outpatient or residential program, depending on the severity of the codeine addiction. Ken Seeley Communities offers compassionate support at every juncture of the recovery process. For more details about the program, please reach out to Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

Prescription Opioid to Heroin Use

Prescription Opioid to Heroin Use

The past twenty years has revealed a disturbing trend that the pharmaceutical companies in concert with the medical field were complicit in promoting. Over-prescribing prescription opioids, such as OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet, and Opana, has led to a national drug epidemic resulting in millions of people developing an addiction to these drugs. While doctors were initially misinformed about the drugs’ potential for addiction by the manufacturers, financial compensation lured them into unscrupulous prescribing practices that have had devastating consequences.

A pattern emerged about a decade ago, when it was noticed that heroin use had dramatically increased. This was strange because for decades heroin had been relegated to the fringe among recreational drug users. Suddenly, heroin addiction was on the rise in segments of the population where it had not formerly been common, such as in upscale suburban communities. Eventually, a connection between prescription opioid to heroin use was revealed, explaining the spike in heroin addiction.

Why People Shift From Prescription Opioid to Heroin Use

Prescription opioids are extremely addicting, even in as little as two weeks of prescribed use a patient can become addicted. When the prescription runs out, the individual will begin to feel sick, therefore asking for a refill. When the doctor finally refuses to refill the prescription, the now addicted patient becomes desperate. They may search for the opioids on the Internet or purchase the pills on the street. They may begin doctor shopping, hoping to score a new prescription. But when all avenues eventually dry up, the individual may shift from prescription opioid to heroin use.

Heroin is also an opioid, created from morphine, which is derived from the opium poppy plant. Prescription opioids have a similar effect to heroin, so gravitating to heroin when the synthetic opioids are no longer available or affordable is a natural step for the addict to take. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 80% of heroin users report first misusing prescription opioids. Heroin offers these individuals a more potent high at a fraction of the cost.

Overcoming a Heroin Addiction

It is a very difficult decision to seek out treatment for a heroin addiction no matter what devastation it has done to one’s life. The prospect of being “dope sick,” and then going through the painful process of detox and withdrawal can be a significant barrier to treatment. While this fear is understandable, it is important for loved ones to help the heroin addict to focus on the longer view. In some cases, accessing the services of a professional interventionist is the most effective and expedient way to get a loved one to the point of accepting help.

Once the individual has agreed to enter treatment, they will embark on an extended stay at a residential rehab where they will be guided through the early phases of the recovery journey. These phases include:

  • Medical detox. The individual will undergo detox and withdrawal under the supervision of a medically trained detox team that will provide medical interventions to ease withdrawal symptoms.
  • Therapy. Psychotherapy will be scheduled throughout the week, alternating between individual therapy sessions with a licensed psychotherapist, group sessions that are led by a therapist or clinician, and family-focused sessions where family members are invited to participate.
  • Medication-assisted treatment. In many instances, medications such as Suboxone, methadone, or Vivitrol are used as a replacement for the heroin in early recovery in conjunction with psychotherapy.
  • Classes. Addiction education helps individuals gain a better understanding of the effects of opioids on the brain and how the drug alters brain chemistry and function. The classes also focus on planning relapse prevention strategies, and equip the individual with essential recovery skills.
  • Holistic activities. Learning how to manage emotions, stress, and difficult life events in recovery is an essential asset. Utilizing activities that promote relaxation and reduce stress will help the individual stay on track. These include deep breathing exercises, yoga, meditation, massage therapy, and mindfulness.

Continuing Care After Rehab

Once the rehab program has been successfully completed, the individual will need to access continuing care services to reinforce their newfound freedom from drug addiction. These include ongoing weekly outpatient therapy and classes, sober living housing, and active participation in a recovery community such as A.A.’s 12-step meetings or SMART Recovery meetings. Heroin addiction is treatable. Why not break free from the grip of addiction and begin your journey back to happiness today.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers Opioid Addiction Treatment in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities is a comprehensive addiction recovery program offering intervention, medical detox, rehabilitation, sober living, and aftercare services. At Ken Seeley Communities, the expert clinical staff is highly experienced in treating individuals who have segued from prescription opioid to heroin use. Providing the latest in proven, evidence-based addiction treatment protocols, Ken Seeley Communities will guide each client through the phases of opioid recovery with respect and compassion. For more information about Ken Seeley Communities, please contact us at (877) 744-0502.

alcohol symptoms next day

Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms Next Day and Beyond

Alcohol poisoning is a potentially fatal event that occurs when an individual consumes a high level of alcohol over a short period of time. The result of binge drinking on college campuses has been well document, with many tragic deaths occurring as a result of the dangerous drinking behavior. Alcohol poisoning doesn’t have to be related to partying college kids, however. There is the potential for anyone to drink to excess, either intentionally or accidentally, through chronic over drinking, which could result in a devastating outcome.

It is important to recognize alcohol poisoning symptoms, next day effects, and long-term alcohol abuse consequences. Alcohol has the potential to upend one’s life, leading to substantial negative health effects and serious ramifications generally. Avoiding the dangers of excessive alcohol consumption requires knowledge of, and a healthy respect for, the risks of drinking.

About Alcohol Poisoning

The human body is only capable of metabolizing a certain amount of alcohol. The liver is able to process about one ounce of liquor per hour, meaning that drinking in excess of that amount will result in the non-metabolized alcohol accumulating in the blood. When the liver, bloodstream, and body tissues become overwhelmed by excessive alcohol consumption, the alcohol causes toxicity.

The guidelines established by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Addiction state that women should drink no more than three drinks in a given day or seven drinks per week. Men should not exceed 4 drinks in a given day or 14 drinks per week. Blood alcohol concentration can reach the legal limit of .08 g/dl after a woman drinks 4 drinks in a two hour period, or a man drinks 5 drinks in that same time span.

When alcohol toxicity occurs the body’s ability to metabolize it has been overridden, leading to very serious potential health risks. The individual will experience the following signs:

  • Low body temperature
  • Irregular breathing
  • Pale, clammy skin
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Mental confusion
  • Vomiting
  • Seizure
  • Incoherent
  • Coma

In the event of alcohol poisoning, it is considered a life- threatening emergency. While waiting for the first responders to arrive, keep the individual in an upright position and attempt to keep them awake. Do not leave the individual alone. Once at the hospital, the individual will be treated based on severity. The individual will likely need intravenous hydration and glucose. They may require a breathing tube until normal breathing is restored. In some instances, the stomach will need to be pumped to quickly eliminate the remaining alcohol contents in the system.

Untreated alcohol poisoning can result in asphyxiation due to the individual vomiting and not being able to expel it. Other serious after affects include possible brain damage, hypothermia, or hypoglycemia. Alcohol poisoning will have impacted the liver, pancreas, and stomach, causing inflammation. The alcohol poisoning symptoms next day may resemble a severe hangover as the body attempts to stabilize.

Prevention of Alcohol Use Disorders

Anyone who has experienced binge drinking, even without reaching a state of alcohol poisoning, can see how extreme the after affects are. The obvious short-term affects include nausea, vomiting, headache, fever, stomach distress, increased risk of accidents, DUI, or unsafe sex. In addition, alcohol abuse at a young age is a risk factor for eventually developing an alcohol use disorder later on.

Practicing safe drinking practices from early adulthood is key to avoiding the potential of addiction. Being cognizant of the temptations to party in college and setting self-boundaries for participating in social drinking is important in establishing self-moderation and control with regard to drinking and the affects of alcohol abuse.

If there is a mental health issue present, it is important to address it and get some therapy. Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent mental health conditions that can drive alcohol abuse. In an attempt to minimize psychological suffering, alcohol can be used as a crutch, which can develop into an alcohol use disorder over time.

The Importance of Getting Help for an Alcohol Use Disorder

Ignoring an alcohol use disorder is never advisable. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive, relapsing brain disease that is relentless in its trajectory. Ignoring the burgeoning problem will only allow the alcohol issue to continue to worsen, so delaying treatment or counseling is not productive.

The reasons why someone becomes alcoholic is still not fully understood. Science has not yet determined why one heavy drinker becomes addicted or dependent on alcohol and another does not. Genetic predisposition, family history, personality traits, individual biology, and life events can all play a part in the development of an alcohol use disorder. When an individual has experienced enough alcohol poisoning symptoms, next day and beyond, they will hopefully elect to get help. For the best recovery outcomes it is best to seek professional help when an unhealthy pattern of alcohol consumption becomes evident.

Medically Supervised Detox

Before entering a rehab for alcoholism it is first necessary to complete a medically supervised detox. Alcohol detox can turn potentially dangerous, necessitating trained detox specialists who are able to quickly respond if withdrawal symptoms become erratic. In most cases, the alcohol detoxification segment of the recovery process will take about a week to complete.

During detox, the brain and central nervous system will respond to the absence of alcohol by becoming destabilized. As the body attempts to normalize the individual will go through withdrawals, the unpleasant symptoms that will vary in severity depending on how long a history the individual has with heavy drinking, the general health and age of the person, and whether there is a coexisting mental health disorder.

Withdrawal symptoms may include:

  • Sweating
  • Shakiness
  • Hand tremors
  • Chills
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Insomnia
  • Seizures
  • Hallucinations

To help manage the symptoms, the detox team will provide benzodiazepines and other medications.

Comprehensive Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder

To treat an alcohol use disorder there are two types of rehabs available, outpatient and inpatient, or residential. The outpatient option is less intensive, lower cost, and more flexible, but it is only appropriate for mild to moderate alcohol use disorders. The residential option provides an extended stay at a treatment center where a broad schedule of therapeutic activities will consume much of the day. This includes psychotherapy, group therapy, medication management where appropriate, addiction education, and 12-step programming.

Ken Seeley Communities Provides Early Intervention Services and Rehab for Alcoholism in Palm Springs, CA

Ken Seeley Communities wants to make a difference in the prevalence of binge drinking and alcohol abuse by providing services to help individuals get help earlier rather than later. If your loved one is engaging in dangerous binge drinking behaviors, consider contacting Ken Seeley Communities for our expert and renowned intervention services. Ken Seeley was featured on the hit A&E series, Intervention, as well as being interviewed by major networks about his effective intervention techniques.

Ken Seeley Communities provides all aspects of alcohol addiction treatment, covering the spectrum of services including interventions, outpatient rehab, residential rehab, dual diagnosis treatment, sober living housing, and continuing care services. Our focus is on early intervention and comprehensive treatment, all within the context of a compassionate and respectful treatment environment. For more details about our intervention services and recovery programs, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

Dual Diagnosis Alcohol and Depression

Dual Diagnosis Alcohol and Depression

A dual diagnosis occurs when an individual is struggling with both a substance use disorder and a coexisting mental health disorder. Dual diagnosis is a complex and prevalent condition that impacts about 25% of those with a drug or alcohol addiction, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Of those, the most common is the dual diagnosis alcohol and depression combination.

There are two ways the dual diagnosis alcohol and depression can develop. In some cases, the individual is experience a major depressive episode and may turn to alcohol as a means of self-medicating their emotional pain away. Over time, the tolerance to alcohol increases, resulting in more excessive drinking and potentially alcohol addiction. This is a situation where depression was a precursor to alcoholism. In others, the individual develops alcoholism first. As the consequences that result from the alcohol addiction mount, depression can set in, indicating that alcoholism can trigger a depressive disorder. In both scenarios, the dual diagnosis alcohol and depression is the outcome.

This particular dual diagnosis is a particularly dangerous one. Because alcohol is a depressant, and can cause major devastation in all aspects of one’s life, when co-occurring with depression there is a higher risk of suicide. In fact, suicide rates among alcoholics are exorbitantly high. According to a study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, among alcoholics, the lifetime risk of suicide is 10%-15%, and that, in fact, depression and alcoholism were comorbid in 85% of 100 cases of completed suicide.

Treatment for individuals who present with this dual diagnosis of alcohol and depression will need to be provided through a specialized dual diagnosis provider where both disorders will be treated simultaneously for the best recovery outcome. These programs include psychiatric expertise on staff that are trained to respond to the issues that may emerge during detoxification and rehab.

Signs of the Dual Diagnosis Alcohol and Depression Co-Occurrence

The symptoms of both disorders, depressive disorder and alcohol dependency, will be evident in individuals who have developed this dual diagnosis. These symptoms include:

Depression

  • Sadness, despair, hopelessness
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of desire to participate in usual activities
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Insomnia or hypersomnia
  • Slowed motor and cognitive functioning
  • Inappropriate feelings of shame or guilt
  • Trouble concentrating or making decisions
  • Suicidal thoughts

Alcoholism

  • Tolerance increases causing increased alcohol consumption
  • Experiences blackouts
  • Increasing time spent thinking about, obtaining alcohol, and recovering from drinking
  • Continue to drink despite negative consequences
  • Secretive behavior, hiding alcohol, lying about how much is being consumed
  • Efforts to quit or cut back are ineffective
  • Physical signs include bloating, glassy eyes, ruddy complexion
  • Withdrawal signs commence when alcohol is not available

Characteristics of Alcoholism and Coexisting Depression

The fallout for this dual diagnosis can be exceptional. Struggling with both depression and alcohol dependency can result in a slew of negative consequences. This can be due to the increased impulsivity of the alcoholic, an increase in risk-taking behaviors, and neglecting obligations, among other causes.

Consequences of the dual diagnosis of alcoholism and depression might include:

  • Loss of job
  • Divorce or interpersonal relationship issues
  • Loss of custody
  • Financial consequences due to job loss
  • Legal problems, such as getting a DUI
  • Health problems, such as pancreatitis, liver disease, heart disease, cancer
  • Accidents that result in injury to self or others, or damaged property

Individuals with a dual diagnosis of alcoholism and depression should not ignore the need for professional help. Loved ones who recognize these signs and symptoms are encouraged to seek out treatment for the individual.

Suicide Prevention

One of the more devastating consequences of alcoholism/depression co-occurring disorders is the dramatically increased risk of suicide. Primary care providers are being trained to assess for risk of suicide among patients who are alcohol dependent, hopefully increasing referrals to addiction treatment programs. These patients should be questioned about possible presence of depression symptoms as a way of identifying suicide risk in this group.

Suicide awareness includes recognizing symptoms such as:

  • Prolonged and persistent sadness, signs of hopelessness
  • The individual conveys the opinion that his or her loved ones are better off without them
  • Isolating behaviors
  • Loneliness
  • Successive setbacks that occur, such as relationship problems, loss of employment, financial difficulties
  • Appear to be giving away prized possessions
  • Making end of life arrangements
  • Saying goodbye to loved ones and friends
  • Acquiring the means to commit suicide, such as a firearm, rope, pills

If there is a present danger of suicide, immediately contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255.

Comprehensive Treatment for Dual Diagnosis

Treatment for the dual diagnosis will involve a full spectrum of therapeutic interventions that work together in an integrated approach to recovery. These treatment elements include:

Medically supervised detox and withdrawal: Alcohol detox should always be medically supervised, as potentially dangerous withdrawal symptoms can suddenly emerge. Detoxification is treated using benzodiazepines and other medications to ease symptoms.

Individual psychotherapy: Therapy is an essential core element for treating both disorders. The therapist will guide the individual to examine sources of emotional pain and help them resolve these. In addition, cognitive behavioral therapy helps shift addiction responses toward positive, productive behavioral responses, as well as teaching coping skills.

Group counseling. Group therapy supports peer interaction and is a source for sharing and accountability.

Medication management. Medications for the mental health disorder and/or the alcoholism may include antidepressants and naltrexone.

Relapse Prevention: Individuals create a detailed relapse prevention strategy by identifying specific triggers or situations that could lead to relapse, and response strategies as well.

Continuing care services: Following completion of the program, sober living housing, 12-step group participation, and outpatient counseling are strongly encouraged.

Ken Seeley Communities Provides Expert Dual Diagnosis Treatment

Ken Seeley Communities is a Palm Springs-based addiction and dual diagnosis recovery program. The expert dual diagnosis clinical staff is trained to treat both disorders, alcoholism and depression, concurrently, providing detox, rehab, and sober living transitional housing. Ken Seeley Communities features a unique approach to guiding individuals into recovery, including intervention services and a subsequent continuum of care throughout the recovery process. For more detail about the program, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

 

10 relapse triggers

10 Relapse Triggers

Like the drip, drip, drip of a leaky pipe before it blows, the onset of a relapse begins with small, nearly undetectable, signs. As anyone in recovery will tell you, the threat of relapse is ever present as the “monster” just lies in wait. As it is often referred to, addiction is a wily foe. It is stealthy and omnipresent, and seeks opportunities should you let your guard down.

While in treatment there is an important emphasis on relapse prevention planning. Clients are encouraged to give this assignment careful attention, and to do a thorough and introspective review of potential triggers. Many triggers are obvious, such as hanging out with people who use or drink or becoming over confident to the point of deluding yourself. But with so many possible triggers that can trip up the newly sober individual it bears reviewing here the most common 10 relapse triggers.

That Are the Most Common 10 Relapse Triggers?

Early recovery requires constant vigilance on behalf of the newly sober individual. The addict brain is cunning and will continue to try to convince you to return to using. Being aware of the traps is intrinsic to overcoming the lure when the wrong path beckons. The 10 relapse triggers that most often befall the recovering addict or alcoholic include the following:

  1. Boredom. Too much down time can allow the mind to conjure up ideas and thoughts about using drugs or alcohol in order to relieve boredom. Just being still and alone with oneself if sometimes very difficult in early recovery, tempting some to return to the substance.
  2. Loneliness. Cutting old friends loose in recovery can result in feelings of loneliness. Loneliness is a very powerful emotion that can quickly lead to romancing the substance again, using it as substitution for a human relationship.
  3. Stress. In many cases, abusing drugs or alcohol was initially used as a coping tool for managing stress, so navigating stress in recovery without the crutch can be challenging. Work and family stress can overpower someone in recovery, leading to a relapse.
  4. Mental health disorder. An untreated or undiagnosed mental health condition, such as depression or anxiety, can be very triggering. Many with a mood disorder or anxiety used alcohol or drugs to self-medicate, or mask the difficult symptoms.
  5. Glamorizing addiction. After a certain period of sobriety it is common for those in recovery to begin playing head games with themselves, romancing their time as an addict and pining away for those freewheeling days.
  6. Social connections. Continuing to hang out with friends or acquaintances that party and do not support your recovery will eventually trigger a relapse.
  7. Dating. A.A. recommends that someone in early recovery wait a year before initiating a new relationship. Romantic strife or a breakup can trigger deep emotions that may trigger a relapse.
  8. Overconfidence. Many a recovering addict has fallen victim to overconfidence. After a year or so it may seem entirely reasonable that you can handle having just one drink at an event, resulting in a weeklong bender that ends with a readmit to rehab.
  9. Stop working the program. Recovery is hard work. It requires your constant attention and a lot of self-discipline. Some may grow weary from this and begin to skip meetings or continue nurturing sober friendships and connections, and that can leave the person vulnerable to relapse.
  10. Guilt and shame. In recovery, many may feel the full effect of the damage done and harm caused while in active addiction. The feelings of guilt and low self-esteem around these realizations can lead the person to believe there is no point in remaining sober.

Addiction is a complex disease. The triggers that could send one person careening toward relapse may not affect another at all. Knowing your own particular weaknesses and vulnerabilities and humbly seeking support when it becomes clear that the “pipe is springing leaks” and is about to burst. Call someone. Go to a meeting. Distract yourself with a project. Do not let the wily one win.

Ken Seeley Communities is a Full Service Addiction Program in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities provides a wide range of addiction treatment services, including intervention services, medical detox, outpatient programming, residential rehab, and sober living housing. Our continuing care services can help the newly sober client confront the 10 relapse triggers mentioned above and reinforce relapse prevention. Ken Seeley has a long career in the field of addiction recovery, and is well known for his appearances on A&E’s Intervention series.

Nestled in a beautiful and serene desert setting in Palm Springs, California, Ken Seeley Communities offers an effective blend of evidence-based psychotherapies, complimentary holistic therapies, and a sense of community that helps foster a new healthy life in recovery. For more information about our spectrum of services, please reach out to Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

Help With DTs From Drinking

Help With DTs From Drinking

Alcoholism can completely upend a person’s life, as well as negatively impacting the people closest to them. The disease takes on a mind of its own after chemical dependency develops, wiping out any semblance of free will. No matter how desperately someone may desire sobriety, the deeply embedded addiction triggers and behaviors are usually impossible to overcome without professional help.

It is never too late to get needed help for an alcohol use disorder. Even later stage alcoholics can still reverse damage and change their lives, adding years of productivity and enjoyment to their life. However, one of the most strident deterrents to getting treatment for an advanced alcohol use disorder is the fear of going through detox and withdrawal.

True, alcohol detox can be especially daunting, with potentially life-threatening withdrawal symptoms, such as the delirium tremens (DTs) suddenly appearing halfway through the detox process. But in a medical detox there is specialized help with DTs from drinking excessively over a long period of time. These trained detox professionals are fully equipped to manage such serious symptoms, and to guide the individual through safely.

Overcoming Fear of the DTs

What exactly is the delirium tremens, or the DTs, anyway? Some mistakenly confuse the term “DTs” with the hand tremors or body shakes that can occur in alcohol withdrawal. The DTs is actually considered a very serious health emergency that can emerge during alcohol detox rather unexpectantly. The DTs are most common among those who have been heavy drinkers for a long time, impacting about 5% of individuals going through detox. Of those who experience the DTs, 5-15% will die from the condition.

The DTs may come on at or around the third day of detox. However, in some cases, detox may be winding down when, on day seven the sudden symptoms of the DTs begin. Symptoms of the DTs include:

  • Uncontrollable tremors
  • Fever
  • Severe mental confusion
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Extreme anxiety
  • A sense that insects are crawling under the skin
  • Seizures
  • Heart failure

Sometimes the DTs will emerge when an unexpected hospital stay is required of a chronic alcoholic. In the hospital there will be no access to alcohol, meaning the emergence of withdrawal symptoms and possibly the DTs.

Getting Help With DTs From Drinking

While the DTs are a frightening possibility to consider, keeping perspective is key. Not only does it affect only a small percentage of alcoholics going through detox, when an individual undergoes detox in a medically supervised setting, their vital signs will be closely watched for the duration of the detox, and medical interventions are provided to reduce the possibility of seizures. Additionally, the medical detox providers can quickly identify the onset of symptoms and get immediate emergency medical help for the individual.

Getting help with DTs from drinking excessively for an extended period may mean a hospital stay to stabilize the individual and improve the outcome. Treatment will involve benzodiazepines and/or barbiturates or phenobarbital, often using IV infusion for quick relief and stabilization until symptoms subside. Dosing is congruent with the specific withdrawal signs observed, such as delirium, and will incrementally be reduced over a period of several days once the severe symptoms have stabilized.

Transitioning From Detox to Treatment

It is essential to complete detox before beginning to participate in an addiction recovery program. Once stabilized, the individual will embark on an intensive treatment program at a residential rehab center where they will stay for the duration commensurate with the severity of their alcohol addiction. Programs may be one month to one year in length.

Alcoholism is treated using an array of interventions that work together to usher in a new sober lifestyle. To arrive at that goal, one must first overhaul the learned addiction behaviors and develop new health thought and behavior patterns. This is a process that takes time and patience for the new habits to take root. These are taught through such evidence-based approaches as cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, motivation enhancement therapy, and contingency management. Therapy is provided in both individual sessions and in group formats, and may include family members and spouses.

How to Stay Sober in Recovery

Remaining sober will be a lifelong endeavor, requiring sobriety to be one’s number one priority. Without sobriety everything else will fall apart. Achieving a sustained recovery is the result of adopting new coping skills to access in times of distress. These recovery skills may include anger management techniques, stress reduction exercises, conflict resolution skills, and relaxation techniques.

Another helpful source of support are recovery groups, such as A.A. or non-12 step groups like SMART Recovery. These recovery communities offer much needed social support where challenges can be discussed among others with the same types of challenges who also value sobriety. These groups are a good source for making new sober friends and promote accountability to someone other than oneself.

Sober living housing is an excellent way to transition from rehab toward one’s home community, allowing a period of time to reside in a substance-free environment. Sober living offers peer support, accountability to the other roommates and the house rules, and provides a deterrent to relapse by requiring regular drug and alcohol testing.

Embracing a new healthy lifestyle is another predictor of recovery success. Individuals who adopt healthy routines, such as getting regular exercise and eating a nutritious diet, find they begin to care more about their overall wellness, which deters relapse. As health is restored, individuals become more confident and content with their new lives in recovery.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers Comprehensive Treatment for Alcoholism in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities provides a full spectrum of addiction services, including intervention services, medical detox that includes help from DTs from drinking, addiction treatment and rehabilitation, outpatient therapy, and sober living housing. Specializing in creating fully individualized treatment plans for each and every client, Ken Seeley Communities blends a variety of interventions to align with the client’s unique recovery goals. For more information about our continuum of addiction services, please connect with Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

stages of withdrawal from Norco

Stages of Withdrawal From Norco

No one enjoys suffering from pain of any kind. So when a doctor prescribes a pain reliever, such as Norco (hydrocodone) following a serious injury or a surgical procedure, it is usually welcomed with open arms. Although the majority of patients might be able to take the opioid medication for a week or so with no trouble discontinuing use when pain symptoms subside, others may already be addicted to the drug. Norco addiction sneaks up silently, with little or no warning that a problem is developing at first.

The first sign that there is an issue comes when the prescription runs out and you experience signs of withdrawal. These physical and psychological symptoms indicate that the brain has already altered its neurotransmitters in anticipation of ongoing Norco dosing. When the drug is suddenly discontinued, individuals who have developed a dependency to the drug will feel sick.

What happens next is what can be the blueprint for a serious drug addiction to develop. If the individual just toughs out a day or two of feeling punk, similar to the flu, following a few weeks of Norco use, they will likely be just fine. Their body will readjust to normalcy soon and all is good. However, many people experience those withdrawal symptoms and immediately request a refill of the drug. Some doctors will accommodate the request, thus deepening the dependency, while others will offer them alternative pain relieving measures.

Again, patients who accept the advice of the doctor and access alternatives to opioids will usually have little problem pushing through a week or so of feeling lousy. Others will be bound and determined to locate the drugs elsewhere.

Signs of Norco Addiction

When these individuals are refused additional prescriptions by their doctor, they may seek other means of finding the drugs. These include:

  • Doctor shopping for a physician or pain clinic that will prescribe more Norcos
  • Stealing the drugs from friends or relatives medicine cabinets
  • Using counterfeit prescription pads to create a prescription for the drug
  • Purchasing Norcos off the Internet
  • Purchasing Norcos from drug dealers on the street

In addition to the drug-seeking behaviors that indicate addiction, those who have developed an addiction or dependency may also exhibit these signs:

  • Constricted pupils
  • Constipation
  • Mental confusion
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Nodding off or losing consciousness
  • Slowed breathing
  • Isolating from friends and family
  • Becoming obsessed with obtaining the drug and taking the drug
  • Declining work or school performance
  • Mounting financial problems
  • Problems with relationships
  • Attempting to quit the Norco but unable to
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when drug not available

Getting Help For a Norco Addiction

When the signs of addiction are recognized, there are recovery options for individuals seeking treatment. The first step in recovery will be detoxification, the period in which the body adjusts to not having the drug any longer. Detox will include three stages of withdrawal, with symptoms peaking on days 2 or 3, before beginning to subside.

The stages of withdrawal from Norco begin with symptoms emerging about 6-12 hours after the last dose. Early mild flu-like symptoms evolve into more intensified and highly unpleasant symptoms about halfway through the detox process, and then gradually begin to subside.

Withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive yawning
  • Chills
  • Sweating
  • Goosebumps
  • Muscles and bone pain
  • Insomnia
  • Teary eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Problems with concentration
  • Irritability
  • Agitation
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Fatigue
  • Drug cravings
  • Mood swings
  • Anxiety symptoms
  • Headache
  • Depression, malaise
  • Thoughts of suicide

Although these symptoms are difficult to endure, the detox specialists overseeing the process will be constantly monitoring the progression through the stages of withdrawal from Norco, and will provide medications to help minimize pain and discomfort.

Moving Forward in Recovery

Once the stages of withdrawal from Norco are completed, it is time for the individual to enter the treatment phase of recovery. Treating hydrocodone addiction is the same as treating other opioid addictions, as the drugs have similar effects on the brain. A comprehensive program will include individual therapy sessions, group therapy, medication-assisted treatment, relapse prevention planning, addiction education, family focused therapy, and activities that compliment the traditional evidence-based therapies.

Ken Seeley Communities Provides Treatment for Norco Addiction

Ken Seeley Communities and Rehab is a full service addiction recovery program in Palm Springs, California. Covering all aspects of treatment for hydrocodone addiction, Ken Seeley offers a medically supervised detox program that will help manage the various stages of withdrawal for Norco prior to initiating treatment. We follow up with options for treatment, including intensive outpatient programs, partial hospitalization programming, and residential rehab. For individuals selecting an outpatient option, sober living housing is also available at Ken Seeley Communities. For more details about our program, please reach out to Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.

drugs to treat alcoholism

Drugs To Treat Alcoholism

Anyone who has attempted to quit drinking unsuccessfully understands the powerful grip of alcohol addiction. Alcoholism is a brain disease, a result of the altered brain chemistry and neural pathways that can make it a very daunting and frustrating condition to rise above. While therapy can and does help the alcoholic learn how to break down the deeply engrained addiction behaviors that hold a person captive, it is sometimes not enough to fend off the relentless cravings for alcohol.

In recent years, drugs to treat alcoholism have become available to add additional mettle to the daily battle the recovering alcoholic faces. While recovery from alcoholism requires a comprehensive treatment approach for best outcomes, the medication-assisted treatment for this relentless disease is a welcome treatment element. These drugs are intended as adjunctive measures to further reinforce recovery, and not to be thought of as standalone treatment measures.

Why Is Alcoholism So Hard to Overcome?

Not only can drinking alcohol become addictive, but once addiction or dependency take root, alcoholism can be very difficult—although not impossible!—to overcome. Recovering from alcoholism is very unique to the individual. Some of the same factors that contributed to the addiction in the first place, such as genetics, growing up in a home where alcohol use was prevalent, a history of emotional or physical trauma or abuse, and individual biology, will be issues in recovery.

This means that for some people, beating alcoholism is very challenging. They may have to battle against a genetic predisposition to alcoholism, or mental health issues that keep them dependent on using alcohol for coping with the unpleasant symptoms. For every recovering alcoholic there are the societal pressures to drink, the television commercials and magazine ads that promote alcohol use, and entrenched habits to overcome.

Drugs To Treat Alcoholism

So far, there are three FDA-approved drugs on the market for assisting in alcohol recovery. These include:

  • Disulfiram (Antabuse). Approved in 1951 as a measure to support sobriety in alcoholics, Antabuse acts as a deterrent to drinking. Once the individual is on Antabuse, if they drink they can experience highly unpleasant and even dangerous effects, such as extreme headache, nausea and vomiting, chest pain, heart palpitations, blurred vision, mental confusion, and respiratory difficulty. Knowing that these effects will occur if they drink, the idea is to deter any consideration to drink.
  • Naltrexone (ReVia or Vivitrol). Naltrexone is an opiate antagonist that can block the effects of alcohol in the brain. This results in alcohol not having the usual pleasant effects, instead the individual on naltrexone may feel absolutely nothing when they drink. This in turn reduces alcohol cravings and relapse.
  • Acamprosate (Campral). Campral also works to reduce alcohol cravings and relapse. Additionally, Campral can help minimize the lingering withdrawal symptoms that can persist for months, such as sleep disturbances, edginess, and depression.

These drugs may be prescribed singularly or in combination based on each individual’s unique recovery needs or issues.

Are Drugs to Treat Alcoholism Safe?

When taken under a physician’s supervision, these drugs are generally safe, however there are some side effects that should be noted. Antabuse can have serious health effects, even including heart attack, respiratory failure, coma, and death. For this reason, Antabuse is not recommended for individuals with a history of repeated relapses. Vivitrol, ReVia, and Campral can have side effects such as headache, nausea, headaches, diarrhea, and fatigue.

What Is Comprehensive Treatment for Alcoholism?

Because of the complexity of alcohol dependency, recovery from alcoholism necessitates a multi-modal approach to treatment. Going about beating alcoholism from several different angles offers the best chances at a successful recovery result. There are three primary phases  of alcoholism recovery, including:

 

  • Medical Detox. A medical detox is the first step in the recovery journey, and can be one of the biggest obstacles to initiating treatment for an alcohol use disorder. This is because of the harsh, even dangerous, withdrawal symptoms that arise during detox. For this reason, individuals are cautioned never to approach detox alone without medical supervision. During detox the detox specialists will provide the necessary medications to mitigate many of the withdrawal symptoms, and guide the individual safely through the process. In addition, the detox professionals offer important psychological support as well, as anxiety, depression, insomnia, and mental  confusion are common in detox and withdrawal.
  • Addiction Treatment. Treatment for an alcohol use disorder can be provided in either an outpatient or residential setting. Addiction recovery involves making fundamental changes to the learned behaviors that have kept the person dependent on alcohol. By replacing distorted thoughts and self-destructive addictive behaviors with new positive, constructive thought patterns will eventually become new healthy habits. Medication-assisted treatment is provided as one of the treatment elements for individuals in addiction recovery. Other interventions include psychotherapy, group therapy, holistic therapies, acquiring stress-management skills, active planning to prevent relapse, and 12-step meetings.
  • Continuing Care. An important treatment component includes the continuing care services that will support recovery after rehab is completed. Those in early recovery are very vulnerable to relapse, no matter how committed they are to sobriety. By continuing on with regular outpatient counseling and support services, as well as engaging in a recovery community that provides peer support, the individual will have a supportive backstop when issues that threaten recovery arise. Sober living housing is another excellent continuing care option during outpatient rehab and into the first few months of recovery.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers Alcohol Addiction Treatment in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities and Rehab provides a full spectrum of addiction treatment services in the Palm Springs, California area. These services include professional intervention planning, detox, outpatient rehab, residential rehab, and sober living housing. One of the treatment elements offered at Ken Seeley Communities is medication-assisted treatment, including drugs to treat alcoholism such as naltrexone or Campral. For more information about the program and addiction treatment services, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.