What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Suboxone

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Suboxone?

Suboxone can be a lifesaver for individuals recovering from an opioid addiction or dependency. This medication helps to block the effects of opioids, allowing for a gradual reduction in cravings to return to the drug. Meanwhile, the individual has more time to adjust to a life of sobriety and solidify recovery.

For some who access medication-assisted treatment (MAT), however, there is the potential for the drug one has been taking to reduce the risk of relapse has managed to crossed over and become its own new addiction. In many cases, Suboxone works very well as a short, or sometimes long-term, medication to prevent opioid or opiate relapse.  For some, however, Suboxone can be and prone to abuse and addiction itself.

Because Suboxone is itself a mild opioid, the dangers of dependency can emerge with long-term use. These long-term effects were not foreseen back in 2002 when the FDA approved it for MAT. Because of a long 37-hour half-life, Suboxone is subject to building up in the system, contributing to the risk of potential chemical dependency.

Not all Suboxone addictions develop as a result of being prescribed the medication for recovery assistance. Some individuals access the drug illicitly and use it as a substance of abuse. Whether the Suboxone was legitimately provided or used as a recreational drug, the result of addiction or dependency will require a medical detox and treatment to overcome. This prompts the important question, “What are the withdrawal symptoms of Suboxone” as someone anticipates the detox and withdrawal process.

How Suboxone Addiction or Dependency Develops

Suboxone is comprised of four parts buprenorphine (“bupe”) and one part naloxone. The buprenorphine acts by blocking the opioid receptors in the brain, and the naloxone acts to revers the effects of opioids. Suboxone promised to be a safer, more easily prescribed alternative to methadone, which is still commonly used for individuals in recovery from heroin.

As with any other mind-altering substance, Suboxone can be abused. Indeed, addiction behaviors do die hard. When someone is being treated for an opioid dependency with Suboxone they may become tempted to begin abusing this medication. Some may choose to inject the drug, or snort it, in an effort to experience a high. Over time, the compulsive abuse of Suboxone can develop into a new addiction. When the individual uses Suboxone for an extended period of time, their brain adapts to the regular influx of the drug to the point where it is unable to function normally without Suboxone.

Symptoms of Suboxone Addiction

When someone is struggling with an addiction to Suboxone they will begin to exhibit the classic signs of drug addiction. Suboxone is an opioid, so there are the telltale sights of opioid abuse such as:

  • Escalating tolerance to the drug’s effects, leading to higher consumption of the drug
  • Doctor shopping to obtain additional prescriptions
  • Purchasing the Suboxone off the street or the Internet
  • Paraphernalia related to injecting the drug, such as needles, syringes, a white powdery substance, ropes or tubing to constrict blood flow
  • Loss of interest in recovery efforts once made. Not attending meetings as much or at all, hanging out with old pre-rehab friends, keeping odd hours
  • Neglect of personal hygiene
  • Loss of interest in activities and hobbies once enjoyed
  • Financial struggles due to missing work, spending excessive amounts of money on the drug, legal problems. They may steal money from their loved ones or ask friends for money
  • Loss of weight. Suboxone addiction can lead to loss of appetite, neglecting nutrition, skipping meals and subsequent weight loss

There are also physical signs of Suboxone abuse. These include nausea and vomiting, dilated pupils, tearing of the eyes, impaired speech, fainting, sweating, muscle aches, sleep problems, and drowsiness.

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Suboxone?

Once chemically dependent, if the individual attempts to cease taking the drug, they will experience withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone is a partial opioid agonist, which means that trying to stop it will trigger the same types of withdrawal symptoms of most other opiates.  The withdrawal symptoms will vary from mild to severe based on the length of history using Suboxone, the level of dosing, and the mode used to administer the drug.

Suboxone detox and withdrawal is said to last longer than other opioids because it is chemically designed to block cravings for an extended period of time, meaning that it remains in bodily tissues longer. So, what are the withdrawal symptoms of Suboxone?

Withdrawal symptoms begin approximately 6-12 hours after the last Suboxone dose and include:

  • Nausea
  • Muscle aches
  • Insomnia
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Diarrhea
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Cravings
  • Mood swings

Many of these withdrawal symptoms, such as the gastrointestinal distress, fever, headache, and muscle ache, can be managed using simple over-the-counter medications by the detox team.

Why a Medical Detox is Important for Suboxone

Medical monitoring is important during a Suboxone detox. No one should attempt to just quit the Suboxone. Instead, professional oversight where a doctor can prescribe a tapering program can help minimize withdrawal severity and successfully complete the detox. This, however, means that a Suboxone detox may last up to a month for the most severe addictions. Patience is required in order to safely progress through the detox phase to completion. Individuals who attempt to stop cold turkey are likely to quickly relapse back to Suboxone use as the highly unpleasant symptoms would be difficult to endure.

Depression and cravings may persist for a month or more, which makes the individual at risk for relapse and suicidal ideation. The medical detox team will provide relief for the physical symptoms, as well as offer psychological aid to help manage feelings of depression and anxiety.

Holistic Therapies that Aid Suboxone Detox and Withdrawal

Natural therapies can aid in restoring health while promoting stress reduction during a Suboxone detox. There is much evidence that experiential and holistic therapies can help reduce the discomforts of withdrawing from opioids, and are very useful in ongoing aftercare and relapse prevention following treatment. Some of the holistic therapies used for a Suboxone detox acupuncture, yoga, and meditation. These activities can enhance recovery by regulating stress, as well as provide avenues to self-discovery that might be useful in subsequent addiction recovery.

Using MAT is still considered controversial for purists who prefer total abstinence from opiates as the goal. They argue that substituting one opiate for another has a high likelihood of creating yet another dependency. When this occurs it is necessary to form a new recovery plan that excludes any addictive medications.

Addiction Recovery Treatment for Suboxone Dependency

After the Suboxone detox and withdrawal process is completed, the individual will segue into an addiction treatment program. This is an integral component needed for moving beyond addictive behaviors and into healthy, productive ones that will help sustain recovery from opioids.

Treatment for a Suboxone addiction may be provided in an outpatient setting or a residential setting. The outpatient programs will offer several levels of intensity. In most cases of opioid addiction if outpatient treatment is desired the most intensive level is appropriate. This is the partial hospitalization program (PHP), also referred to as a day program, which requires daily participation in various therapeutic sessions throughout the week. The PHP involves 25-30 hours per week of participation in the therapy and education elements, but provides the flexibility to reside at home during the program. This allows someone who is not able to take an extended leave from family obligations to still obtain the treatment they need following detox.

The residential program involves a long-term commitment of 1-9 months. During the residential program, the individual will reside at the treatment center and participate in a wide variety of treatment elements daily. These programs provide structure and constant support, while allowing the individual to remove themselves from their usual home environment to be able to focus completely on recovery.

What to Expect in Suboxone Recovery Treatment

Most addiction recovery programs, whether it is an outpatient or residential format, will provide fundamental treatment elements to aid the individual in overcoming a Suboxone addiction. These treatment elements include:

  • Psychotherapy sessions. These therapy sessions are conducted one-on-one with a licensed psychotherapist who will assist the individual in identifying key addictive behaviors and patterns. Once these are noted, the therapist will use evidence-based therapies to guide the individual toward adopting more positive and productive thought and behavior patterns in recovery.
  • Peer group sessions. Group therapy involves a small collection of peers who can discuss openly topics related to overcoming addiction. The therapist will provide the topics and facilitate discussions so they are productive and supportive.
  • Education. Addiction education is key to the overall success of the treatment program. In these classes, individuals learn about how opioid addiction develops, and then are taught recovery tools that can help them avoid relapse.
  • Other activities. In a residential program there will be a focus on nutrition and fitness, both important to restoring health and wellness in recovery.
  • Continuing care. Once the treatment program is completed, continuing care services should be accessed for the best chance at obtaining a lasting recovery. These include outpatient counseling, sober living housing, and attending recovery meetings.

Ken Seeley Communities Provides Suboxone Detox Services

Ken Seeley Communities is a integrated addiction recovery program located in Palm Springs, California. At Ken Seeley Communities, our philosophy for recovery from addiction or chemical dependency to Suboxone is centered on a transformational spectrum of treatment elements. This involves the initial medical detoxification process, participation in addiction recovery therapies, and continuing care services such as sober living and outpatient programming to help reinforce sobriety. When wondering what are the withdrawal symptoms of Subonxone, please contact our team for a thorough explanation of the detox and withdrawal process at (877) 744-0502.

 

How Long Does Opiate Withdrawal Last?

Recovery from an opiate addiction or dependency is a multi-phased process that begins with an individual agreeing to get professional help. Whether they arrived at this realization after hitting their bottom, or by being encouraged by loved ones in an intervention doesn’t matter. All that really matters is beginning the recovery journey that will save someone’s life.

In anticipation of the dreaded detox from opiates, one may ask, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” This is an expected question, as anyone with an opiate addiction knows full well what “dope sick” feels like. Just knowing they will have to endure days of discomfort is something that can cause anxiety and even second thoughts about going into treatment.

But knowledge is power. Being somewhat prepared for not only how long does the opiate withdrawal last, but also what to expect in rehab and beyond, can help to form a mental picture of the recovery process. Envisioning the steps that one will be moving through can help to muster courage and feel a little more in control.

What Is Involved in the Recovery Process?

Addiction recovery is a lifelong process that begins with the moment someone agrees to get needed help. Once that important decision has been made, it is time to seek out a treatment program that will align with the individual’s personal preferences, specific addiction features, resources, and mental health needs. There are different types of rehabs, as well as different levels of care, accommodations, and types of services.

Once a program has been selected, there will be an extensive intake process conducted. During the intake evaluation, the individual will participate in an interview with a clinician. This interview will allow the individual to relay the specific details about their opiate addiction history, any co-occurring mental health disorder, and any medical conditions. Clinicians may use assessment tools to help them further determine the new client’s recovery needs.

The rehab program will commence starting with detoxification, followed by an extensive addiction treatment program with intensive therapy, group therapy, and related activities. Once the rehab program is completed, the client should access continuing care services that include outpatient therapy and 12-step meetings at minimum.

Medical Detox for Opiate Addiction

Many clients are curious and ask, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” They may be apprehensive about going through detox and need some reassurance prior to beginning the process. The detox and withdrawal process lasts about one to two weeks in most cases.

During a medically supervised detox individuals will be well attended to. The withdrawal symptoms, which are similar to a bad flu with the added features of psychological symptoms, begin to emerge within 12 hours of the last opiate dosing, peak on days 2-4, and then begin to incrementally subside. During the detox and withdrawal phase of treatment, the detox team will provide medications and other remedies to help ease the discomfort and pain caused by the withdrawal symptoms. So, as worried as a client might be when they inquire, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” they may be surprised to find that it is over before they know it.

Rehab for Opiate Addiction

Treatment for the opiate addiction includes multiple treatment interventions. These include:

  • One-on-one psychotherapy sessions based primarily on CBT
  • Group therapy
  • Family-based counseling
  • 12-step programming
  • Addiction education
  • Relapse prevention strategizing
  • Motivational guest speakers
  • Adjunctive services, such as yoga classes, mindfulness meditation training, art therapy, or other holistic therapies
  • Medication management for medication-assisted treatment

Rehab is available in various outpatient formats or residential, determined largely by the severity of the addiction, whether a client can leave work for an extended period, and the client’s resources.

Medication-Assisted Treatment and Continuing Care

Some individuals will benefit from medication-assisted treatment during early opiate addiction recovery. Drugs, such as naltrexone, Suboxone, or methadone can be prescribed as step-down opioids that can help stabilize the individual as they become accustomed to live without heroin. The drugs are regulated by a physician and may be tapered off by the one-year mark of recovery in many cases.

Continuing care refers to the post-rehab services or activities that can help bolster recovery, especially during the first six months of recovery when clients are most vulnerable. Continuing care might include sober living housing for a few months, continuing on with weekly outpatient therapy, and attending 12-step meetings. All of these activities will help to reinforce early recovery while providing key sources of support.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers All Opiate Addiction Treatment Services

Ken Seeley Communities is a comprehensive addiction treatment program located in Palm Springs, California. Ken Seeley is a renowned professional interventionist, featured on the A&E show, Intervention. Ken Seeley Communities offers the full spectrum of addiction treatment services, including intervention services, medical detoxification, addiction treatment (outpatient and residential), sober living housing, and continuing care services. Contact us with any questions regarding treatment for an opiate addiction, including, “How long does opiate withdrawal last?” Our caring and knowledgeable team is happy to answer all questions. Reach out to us at (877) 744-0502.

 

Prescription Opioid to Heroin Use

Prescription Opioid to Heroin Use

The past twenty years has revealed a disturbing trend that the pharmaceutical companies in concert with the medical field were complicit in promoting. Over-prescribing prescription opioids, such as OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet, and Opana, has led to a national drug epidemic resulting in millions of people developing an addiction to these drugs. While doctors were initially misinformed about the drugs’ potential for addiction by the manufacturers, financial compensation lured them into unscrupulous prescribing practices that have had devastating consequences.

A pattern emerged about a decade ago, when it was noticed that heroin use had dramatically increased. This was strange because for decades heroin had been relegated to the fringe among recreational drug users. Suddenly, heroin addiction was on the rise in segments of the population where it had not formerly been common, such as in upscale suburban communities. Eventually, a connection between prescription opioid to heroin use was revealed, explaining the spike in heroin addiction.

Why People Shift From Prescription Opioid to Heroin Use

Prescription opioids are extremely addicting, even in as little as two weeks of prescribed use a patient can become addicted. When the prescription runs out, the individual will begin to feel sick, therefore asking for a refill. When the doctor finally refuses to refill the prescription, the now addicted patient becomes desperate. They may search for the opioids on the Internet or purchase the pills on the street. They may begin doctor shopping, hoping to score a new prescription. But when all avenues eventually dry up, the individual may shift from prescription opioid to heroin use.

Heroin is also an opioid, created from morphine, which is derived from the opium poppy plant. Prescription opioids have a similar effect to heroin, so gravitating to heroin when the synthetic opioids are no longer available or affordable is a natural step for the addict to take. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 80% of heroin users report first misusing prescription opioids. Heroin offers these individuals a more potent high at a fraction of the cost.

Overcoming a Heroin Addiction

It is a very difficult decision to seek out treatment for a heroin addiction no matter what devastation it has done to one’s life. The prospect of being “dope sick,” and then going through the painful process of detox and withdrawal can be a significant barrier to treatment. While this fear is understandable, it is important for loved ones to help the heroin addict to focus on the longer view. In some cases, accessing the services of a professional interventionist is the most effective and expedient way to get a loved one to the point of accepting help.

Once the individual has agreed to enter treatment, they will embark on an extended stay at a residential rehab where they will be guided through the early phases of the recovery journey. These phases include:

  • Medical detox. The individual will undergo detox and withdrawal under the supervision of a medically trained detox team that will provide medical interventions to ease withdrawal symptoms.
  • Therapy. Psychotherapy will be scheduled throughout the week, alternating between individual therapy sessions with a licensed psychotherapist, group sessions that are led by a therapist or clinician, and family-focused sessions where family members are invited to participate.
  • Medication-assisted treatment. In many instances, medications such as Suboxone, methadone, or Vivitrol are used as a replacement for the heroin in early recovery in conjunction with psychotherapy.
  • Classes. Addiction education helps individuals gain a better understanding of the effects of opioids on the brain and how the drug alters brain chemistry and function. The classes also focus on planning relapse prevention strategies, and equip the individual with essential recovery skills.
  • Holistic activities. Learning how to manage emotions, stress, and difficult life events in recovery is an essential asset. Utilizing activities that promote relaxation and reduce stress will help the individual stay on track. These include deep breathing exercises, yoga, meditation, massage therapy, and mindfulness.

Continuing Care After Rehab

Once the rehab program has been successfully completed, the individual will need to access continuing care services to reinforce their newfound freedom from drug addiction. These include ongoing weekly outpatient therapy and classes, sober living housing, and active participation in a recovery community such as A.A.’s 12-step meetings or SMART Recovery meetings. Heroin addiction is treatable. Why not break free from the grip of addiction and begin your journey back to happiness today.

Ken Seeley Communities Offers Opioid Addiction Treatment in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities is a comprehensive addiction recovery program offering intervention, medical detox, rehabilitation, sober living, and aftercare services. At Ken Seeley Communities, the expert clinical staff is highly experienced in treating individuals who have segued from prescription opioid to heroin use. Providing the latest in proven, evidence-based addiction treatment protocols, Ken Seeley Communities will guide each client through the phases of opioid recovery with respect and compassion. For more information about Ken Seeley Communities, please contact us at (877) 744-0502.

residential drug treatment programs in california

Residential Drug Treatment Programs in California

When taking the first important step toward recovery—the conscious decision to obtain treatment for drug or alcohol addiction—there are some things to consider before deciding on the type of rehab that is best suited for your unique situation. Each person struggling with addiction will have specific features associated with their personal substance use disorder. Because no two addiction stories are alike, a variety of rehab programs exist to offer many options for care.

For example, some addicts may have a long-standing co-occurring mental health disorder, such as depression, anxiety, or an eating disorder. Others may have only recently become hooked on painkillers. Still others may have a poly-substance disorder where multiple drugs are being abused. There are specialized rehabs that will align with each of these very different addiction scenarios.

For individuals with a long history of heavy alcohol or drug abuse, a residential rehab is the best pathway for successful recovery. Residential drug treatment programs in California cover a wide range of treatment philosophies, locales, amenities, and services, providing the opportunity to find a rehab that best suits your recovery needs and goals.

What to Look For in Residential Drug Treatment Programs in California

If you have determined that a residential program is the best fit for your recovery needs, it helps in the selection process to know what constitutes a high quality rehab. Residential drug treatment programs in California may share a common goal of assisting individuals towards living a sober life in recovery. However, the methods they practice, the licensing they hold, and the standards they adhere to can vary significantly.

When deciding on a residential rehab, consider these features:

  • Do they offer medical detox
  • Are they licensed by the state (Department of Health Care Services for Substance Use Disorders), or other licensing such as CARF or Joint Commission (dual diagnosis)
  • How they protect client privacy
  • Do they treat co-occurring mental health issues (if relevant)
  • Do they utilize evidence-based treatment approaches
  • Are they a 12-step or non 12-step based program (per personal preference)
  • What medical practitioners are present on site
  • What psychiatric professionals are present on site (for dual diagnosis)
  • Ask to see a daily/weekly/monthly schedule of therapies and activities
  • As about nutritional services
  • Do they offer family therapy
  • Ask about adjunctive therapies (i.e., DBT skills training, EMDR, holistic activities)
  • Do they provide continuing care services

Medical Detox Services at Residential Rehabs

One of the many benefits of selecting a residential rehab over an outpatient program is the convenience of undergoing the detox process on the premises. Medical detox involves the individual processing through the stages of detox and withdrawal while under the supervision of a medically trained detox professional. Withdrawal symptoms can be highly uncomfortable and, in the case of alcohol detox or benzodiazepine detox, can present sudden health risks. The medical detox team is trained to monitor vital signs and to intervene immediately in an urgent health event.

In a medical detoxification the individual will experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms that vary based on the substance of abuse. These withdrawal symptoms indicate the central nervous system and brain chemistry is attempting to stabilize while the drug is being withheld. The medical detox team provides medications to help ease the symptoms, as well as offer psychological support throughout the detox process.

Treatment Elements in Residential Rehab

Detox is only the first step in the recovery journey. It is not realistic to believe that once detox is completed you are good to go. Powerful cravings and ingrained addiction behaviors will quickly upend any attempt to remain clean and sober. For these reasons it is imperative to complete an extended stay in a residential rehab where coping skills, new thought/behavior patterns, and stress-reduction exercises are taught.

A high quality residential rehab will offer a comprehensive menu of therapeutic activities scheduled throughout the day that are designed to compliment each other and promote healing and personal growth. These will include:

  • Psychotherapy. Talk therapy is beneficial in addiction treatment, as it allows clients to explore past or present issues that are psychologically painful. This one-on-one therapy also helps clients examine self-sabotaging thought patterns that have fueled substance abuse, and replace these with new constructive patterns.
  • Group work. Peer-based therapy sessions and recovery meetings allow clients to bond with others while sharing individual stories of past struggles. These group therapy sessions are facilitated by a clinician who guides discussion towards sharing ideas and offering support.
  • Family counseling. Because the family is such an essential source of support it is helpful to enlist their involvement in their loved one’s treatment. Healing past pains, broken trust bonds, and dysfunctional communication practices can be initiated in family therapy.
  • Classes. Rehabs provide classes that teach clients how addiction develops on a neural/physiological level, which can help deter future substance abuse. Classes to plan strategies for avoiding relapse, to teach coping skills and life skills are also offered.
  • Recreational therapy. Activities that compliment the traditional therapies might include such things as exercise programs, outdoor activities, art and music therapy, yoga classes, and mindfulness training. These activities enhance feelings of competence, self-esteem, and self-empowerment that can augment treatment.
  • Medication management. Some clients may have a coexisting mental health condition that requires medication to help ease symptoms, so these medications can be provided. Also, in some cases medications that assist opiate recovery are prescribed and monitored closely.

Aftercare Recovery Services Following Rehab

An important, and often overlooked, treatment element on the recovery continuum is continuing care. After leaving rehab it can be difficult to adjust to life in recovery. By accessing aftercare services the chances of a sustained recovery are greatly increased. These include sober living housing, weekly outpatient therapy, and 12-step recovery groups.

Ken Seeley Communities and Rehab Provides Residential Treatment in Palm Springs

Ken Seeley Communities is one of the leading residential drug treatment programs in California. With a full spectrum of addiction treatment services available in a tight-knit, supportive environment, Ken Seeley Communities offers the highest caliber of care using both traditional evidence-based therapies and innovative methods. For more information about our residential treatment program, please contact Ken Seeley Communities today at (877) 744-0502.